Principal I’m Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen
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I’m Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen

Año:
2013
Editorial:
Ecco
Idioma:
english
Páginas:
592
ISBN 10:
0061995002
ISBN 13:
978-0061995002
File:
EPUB, 18.48 MB
Descarga (epub, 18.48 MB)

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INDEX

LC indicates Leonard Cohen.

Entries in italics indicate photographs.

The page references in this index correspond to the printed edition from which this ebook was created. To find a specific word or phrase from the index, please use the search feature of your ebook reader.


A&M Records 277, 302

Academy Awards, 1992 362–3, 364

Ace Books 63

AIDS 331, 340

Ali, Muhammad 78, 282

Altman, Robert 238, 286, 355

American Idol 329, 456, 465

Amiel, Barbara 136, 298

Amnesty International 470

Amorós, Andrés 491

Amos, Stanley 198

Amos, Tori 389

Anderson, Laurie 413

Angel (film) 137–8

Anthology of American Folk Music 197, 206

Apple 393

Arista Records 330

Arjatsalo, Jarkko 393, 422

Arjatsalo, Rauli 393

Army, The (LC’s backing band) 223, 228, 229, 231, 243, 471

Arnon, Mordechai ‘Pupik’ 260, 261

Ashbery, John 300

Attar 303

Atwood, Margaret 76, 393, 469

Auden, W. H. 97

Austin City Limits (TV programme) 348

Avant-Garde 202

B.O.N.Y. (Boys of New York) (film) 173

Bacal, Nancy 28, 69, 73, 74–5, 101, 105, 106, 106n, 107, 169, 299–300, 299, 371, 401

Baez, Joan 140, 141–2, 158, 228, 229, 231, 277

Balsekar, Ramesh S. 77, 396, 397, 398–400, 401, 402, 403, 407, 410, 426, 470–1, 480

Band, The 141, 157

Banhart, Devendra 471n

Bard, Stanley 156

Bardot, Brigitte 135–6, 190, 247, 362

Barenaked Ladies 442

Barnes, Cheryl 278

Barrios, Gregory 173

Batalla, Perla 343, 344, 345–6, 345, 351, 364, 365, 366, 370, 372, 375, 382, 413

Baudelaire, Charles 26, 35

Bay of Pigs invasion, Cuba, 1961 95–6

Beach, Mary 198

Bear, The (Faulkner) 54

Beat, The 187

Beatles, The 75, 142, 217

Beats 56–7, 68, 83, 151, 155

Beatty, Warren 238

Beck, Roscoe 301, 302, 305, 306, 307, 330, 331, 332, 337–9, 343, 344, 381, 403, 453, 454–5, 456, 457, 461, 464, 478

Berger, E. Judith 157

Berlin Wall, fall of, 1989 365

Berlin, Irving 366

Berlin, Brigid 172, 173

Bernstein, Leonard 215

Berry, Chuck 506

Bhaktivedanta, Swami 176, 177

Biderman, Ann 198

Biderman, Peggy 198

Bilezikjian, John 302–3, 305, 306, 338, 343, 4; 09

Billboard 221, 393–4, 422, 423, 468, 496

Bindiger, Emily 271

Birney, Earle 127

A Black and White Night (PBS TV special) 356

Blaine, Hal 285, 286, 288

Blakley, Ronee 277, 278, 286, 290–1

Blitz, Thelma 156, 199–200

Blue, Peggy 365

Body, Paul 273

Bonds of the Past (documentary) 239–41

Bono 329, 389, 433, 443, 495

Book of Longing: A Song Cycle Based on the Poetry and Images of Leonard Cohen (Glass) 447–9

Boorman, John 169

Boyd, Joe 238

Brahman 396

Branigan, Laura 278

Brawne, Fanny 72

Breau, Lenny 120

Breavman, Lawrence 91, 109, 110

Brecht, Bertholt 142, 197, 270, 374

Breier, Morton 176, 177

Brit Awards 506

Brittain, Donald 131

Brother Sun, Sister Moon (movie) 215

Brotman, Stuart 302, 302n

Brown, Marian 112

Brown, Mick 290

Browne, Jackson 152–3, 154, 179, 356, 454

Bruce, Bobby 290

Bruce, Kitty 273

Bruce, Lenny 273, 282

Brusq, Armelle 391

Bryant, Boudleaux 193, 208

Bryant, Felice 193, 208

Buckley, Jeff 329–30, 456, 465

Buckley, Tim 152

Buckmaster, Paul 234–5

Buckskin Boys, The 39, 40, 41–2, 137

Buddhism: Beat poets and 56; Book of Longing and 437; Book of Mercy and 315; Death of a Ladies Man and 296; fails to cure LC’s depression 402; LC examines on Hydra 84, 103; LC introduced to his Zen master 82–3, 211–12, 252–3; LC on Mount Baldy, L.A. 252–3, 263, 276, 279, 291, 295, 299–300, 310, 377–96, 378, 400–1, 406, 416, 419, 437, 448, 496; LC ordained as Buddhist monk 390; LC’s Buddhist name: Jikan 390, 391, 395, 437, 445; LC’s Judaism and 176, 300, 308, 314, 438–9; meditation, LC and 248–9, 253, 266, 291, 307, 314–15, 327, 350, 378, 379, 384, 387, 388, 391, 394, 395, 406; Roshi Joshu Sasaki, LC relationship with see Roshi Joshu Sasaki; theft of money from LC and 429–30; Zen Center, Cimarron Street, Los Angeles 175, 211, 252, 279, 299, 300, 357, 365, 377, 380, 385, 386, 391, 403, 448, 476, 496

Bukowski, Charles 301, 491

Burke, Alexandra 329–30

Burroughs, William 119, 198, 240

Byers, Joy 192

Byrds, The 191, 192

Byron, Lord 8, 418, 443

Cage, John 121, 137, 300

Calderon, Jorge 372

Cale, John 294, 329, 329n, 361

Came So Far For Beauty: An Evening of Songs by Leonard Cohen Under the Stars (album) 416

Came So Far For Beauty, LC tribute concert 449; Brighton Festival, 2004 431–2; Canada Day, New York, 2003 412–14, 416, 431; Dublin Theatre Festival, 2006 443; Sydney Festival, 2005 432–3

Campbell, David 366, 407

Campbell, Glen 494

Camus, Albert 167, 168

Canada Council 71, 77, 89, 102

Canadian Army 7, 45

Canadian Broadcasting Company (CBC) 55–6, 71, 97, 101, 119, 124, 134, 139, 157, 231, 241, 259, 268, 306, 312, 330, 478

Canadian Conference of the Arts, Toronto, 1961 96–7

Canadian Consulate, U.S. 412, 416, 431, 476

Canadian Forum 54–5

Canadian Jewish Chronicle 120

Canadian National Film Board 127, 131, 135

Canadian Writer’s Conference, Kingston, Ontario, 1955 48

Canadian’s Author’s Association 315

Captain Beefheart 288

CARP 435

Carter, A. P. 419

Cash, Johnny 161, 194, 202, 203, 204, 207, 225, 226, 285, 496

Caspi, Matti 260, 261

Castro, Fidel 92, 94, 95

Castro, Jason 456

Cavafy, Constantine P. 411

Cave, Nick 332, 361, 413, 431, 432, 443

CBS Records 160, 187, 271

Chagall, Marc 98

Charles, Prince of Wales 346

Charles, Ray 128, 140, 366, 373, 428, 480

Chase, Jeff 169

Chelsea Girls (Warhol film) 150, 155, 172, 179

Chelsea Hotel, New York 146, 154–5, 163, 165, 171, 175, 189–91, 196, 199–201, 213, 226, 251, 469, 469

Chicago Tribune 494

Chieftans 389

Cholst, Dr Sheldon 83

Christensen, Julie 343, 344, 345–6, 351–2, 365, 370, 372, 375, 382, 383, 413, 432, 443

Christie, Julie 238

CIV/n 47–8

Clarkson, Adrienne 434

Clift, Charmian 80, 81, 86, 87, 111, 193, 215

‘Cock Book’ 173

Cocker, Jarvis 431, 495

Cocker, Joe 244, 330

Coe, Terese 197–8

Cogswell, Fred 49–50, 461

Cohen, Adam (son): advises LC to keep shows short on 2008 world tour 462; birth of 250–1; car accident 359, 359; childhood 251, 253, 258, 259, 260, 263, 271, 297, 298, 309, 310, 312, 359, 359; Jewish faith 437, 467; LC’s failing health 506–7, 508; Like a Man 489; on father’s efforts to keep in touch with family despite tensions 310; plays at LC tribute concerts 454; signs record deal with Columbia Records 391; son and 445, 487; Stranger Music: Selected Poems and Songs dedicated to 371–2; You Want it Darker recording 506–7

Cohen, Cassius Lyon (grandson) 445, 487

Cohen, David (cousin) 11, 12, 15, 32, 37, 65, 213

Cohen, Edgar (cousin) 12

Cohen, Esther (sister) 4, 15, 17, 17, 21, 44, 75–6, 390, 469, 469, 505

Cohen, Horace (uncle) 5, 7, 8, 8, 15, 17, 64, 213

Cohen, Larry 158, 170

Cohen, Lawrence (uncle) 7, 63

Cohen, Lazarus (cousin) 12, 30

Cohen, Lazarus (great-grandfather) 6–7, 8, 476–7, 509

Cohen, Leonard:

ALBUMS: An Introduction to Leonard Cohen 416; Blue Alert (collaboration with Anjani Thomas) 430, 440–3, 446, 447, 449–50, 486, 492; Can’t Forget: A Souvenir of the Grand Tour 504; Cohen Live 373; Dear Heather 416–22, 430, 435, 441, 442, 488; Death of a Lady’s Man 281–94, 298, 302, 304, 305, 319, 351, 365, 415, 418, 441; Field Commander Cohen 306–7, 409, 410; Greatest Hits/Best of, 1975 125, 145, 333, 350, 392, 471; I’m Your Man 337–41, 348–9, 350–1, 352, 359, 360–1, 367, 372, 382, 405, 412, 413, 454, 486; Leonard Cohen Live at the Isle of Wight 1970 231, 471; Leonard Cohen: The Complete Columbia Albums Collection 489; Live in Dublin 504; Live in London 471, 504; Live Songs 119, 243n, 255–6, 273, 306–7; More Best Of 392, 394; New Skin for the Old Ceremony 190, 263–7, 268–71, 276, 295, 442, 488; Old Ideas 488, 491–5, 496, 497, 503–4, 506; Popular Problems 504–5, 506; Recent Songs 209, 300–9, 408–9; ‘Songs for Rebecca’ (unreleased) 274, 276, 284, 285, 304, 317, 322; Songs from a Room 85–6, 192, 200–10, 228, 233, 235, 236, 293, 455, 471, 492; Songs from the Road 478, 489, 504; Songs of Leonard Cohen 160–4, 170, 171, 175–88, 194, 203, 206, 228, 236, 238, 388, 443, 471, 471n, 489, 494; Songs of Love and Hate 202, 231, 233–6, 240, 241, 242, 257, 270, 361, 415, 443, 455, 471; Ten New Songs 363, 406–7, 410–12, 417, 418, 422, 440, 442, 454, 507; The Essential Leonard Cohen 416, 471; The Future 323, 339, 357, 358, 364–70, 372–4, 376, 380, 381, 382, 384, 405, 410, 413, 428–9, 450, 451, 453, 464, 511; The Very Best of Leonard Cohen 489; tribute albums see under individual album name; Various Positions 309, 316–30, 337, 351, 367, 381, 405, 442; You Want It Darker 506–7, 508–9

AWARDS/HONOURS: Brit Awards 506; Canadian Folk Music Walk of Fame, plaque on 433; Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame, inducted into 434; Canadian’s Author’s Association Award for Lyrical Poetry 315; Companion of the Order of Canada 416; Crystal Globe award, Columbia Records 341; Glenn Gould Prize 487–8, 489; Governor General’s Award for Literature 212–13; Governor General’s Award for Lifetime Artistic Achievement 374–5; Grammy Award for Lifetime Achievement 476, 489; honorary degree, McGill University 374; honorary doctorate, Dalhousie University, Halifax 236; Juno Awards 367, 374, 412, 506; Juno Hall of Fame, Canada, inducted into 362, 374; Leonard Cohen Poet-in-Residence programme, Westmount High, Montreal 469; McGill Literary Award 55; Officer of the Order of Canada 362, 372; PEN New England Song Lyrics of Literary Excellence 495, 506; plaque at Chelsea Hotel 469, 469; Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, U.S. 455–6; Songwriters Hall of Fame, Canada 434; Songwriters Hall of Fame, U.S. 477; The Prince of Asturias Award for Letters, Spain 489–91

CHARACTER AND APPEARANCE: alcohol use 133, 173, 189, 211, 248, 266, 272, 279, 282, 283, 290, 294, 302, 322, 350, 366, 370, 381, 382, 444, 445, 446, 458, 464, 476, 484, 485, 496; appearance 1, 4, 5, 11, 14, 17, 22, 24–5, 25, 27, 28n, 37, 40, 43, 51, 60, 73, 85, 93, 141, 143, 146, 166, 183, 184, 187, 199, 209, 212, 214, 230, 232, 249, 251, 254, 256, 269, 273, 275, 285, 292, 297, 299, 319, 326, 336, 345, 347, 353, 359, 373, 375, 383, 414, 417, 420, 459, 460, 463, 466, 467, 472, 480, 484, 492, 497; birthdays 199–200, 273, 378, 471, 491, 504, 505; blue raincoat 72, 113, 140, 231, 333; courtly manner 1, 54, 67, 269; debating, talent at 36, 45, 199; death, thoughts on/approach towards 503, 507–8, 509–10; depression 57, 58, 70, 77, 78, 105, 129, 147, 205, 233, 234, 236, 252, 267–8, 308, 349–50, 352, 395–402, 404–5, 425, 426, 435, 493; dress sense 1, 4, 28n, 37, 52, 92, 94, 95, 140, 187, 197, 199, 200, 218–19, 228, 283, 285, 301, 333, 340, 344, 345, 362, 377, 390, 397, 433, 448, 471, 477, 483, 491–2, 497; drug taking 102, 103, 104, 105, 128, 129, 140, 146, 164, 171, 172, 180, 218, 220, 225, 228, 229, 230, 230, 248, 350–1, 395, 484; fasting 67, 68, 104, 129, 137, 244, 386, 405; father, becomes a 250–2, 267–8 see also Cohen, Adam and Cohen, Lorca; father’s death, reaction to 15–17, 24, 53, 58, 77, 282, 501; flight, instinct for 78; Greece, love of 1, 81–2, 83, 173 see also Hydra, Greece; gun, father’s 9, 45, 78, 296; guns, use of 209–10, 211; hedonism 68; height 4, 24–5; heroes 480; heroism/ military, love of 9, 45, 78, 92–7, 93, 97, 100, 107, 209–10, 211, 260–2, 296; homosexuality and 67; humour 1, 28n, 66, 70, 87, 110, 116, 133, 134, 183, 190, 339, 361, 368, 389, 412, 425, 431–2, 468, 488; hygiene habits 28n, 37; hypnotism, interest in 18, 19–20, 177, 179, 197, 230; internet and 393–4, 451; love life see under individual lover name; manners, old-world 1, 4, 12, 37, 303; marriage and 64, 268, 291, 295–6, 357, 367, 384–5, 386, 405, 438, 450; meditation 82, 248–9, 250, 253, 266, 291, 299, 307, 314–15, 327, 350, 378, 379, 384, 387, 388, 391, 394, 395, 400, 402, 403, 406, 437, 438, 446, 476, 492; movies, love of 26, 67; night ramblings and 25–6, 33; old age and 425, 435, 445, 494, 506; outlaw, love of 101, 187; outsider 57, 151, 234; perfectionism 128, 325, 358, 381, 465; personal ad, wish to reply with Iggy Pop to 339; psychotherapy 350; sainthood, yearnings for 68, 128, 160, 304, 354, 390; serenity 449; shyness 1, 28, 36, 56, 142, 151, 173, 356, 381, 432, 450, 459; smoking 113, 132, 133, 169, 193, 257, 272, 312, 357, 380, 401, 404, 423, 445, 458, 464, 484, 498, 506, 508; structure, need of 502; survival instinct 77, 426; travel, instinct for 78; violence, interest in 55, 94, 118; weight 68, 278

CHILDHOOD AND FAMILY: ancestors 6, 16, 23, 97, 185, 270, 326–7, 438, 476–7; birth 3–4; childhood 4–18, 5, 11, 14, 17; family background, immediate 3–12; Hebrew name 7, 261; Lithuanian ancestry 6, 8, 326–7, 448; ‘messianic childhood’ 72, 78; school and 9, 15, 18, 20–1, 22–3, 23, 24, 28, 34–5, 36, 38, 469; Summer Camp 21–2, 24, 28, 30–1, 37, 67–8, 91, 110, 206, 209, 231; teenage years 19–33, 25, 27; university 34–53, 43

CONCERTS: Aix festival, 1970 221–3, 234; Bird on a Wire documentary 186n, 256–7, 263, 479, 480; Blue Alert tour 450; book signing, Toronto, 2006 440; collapses on stage, Valencia, 2009 468–9; compression fractures of the spine 506; debut, Village Theatre, WBAI benefit, 22nd February, 1967 158–60, 165, 381; Expo ’67, Montreal 160, 168–9; I’m Your Man tour 343–8, 372, 382; Las Vegas, 2010 481–2, 481; Mariposa Folk Festival, 1967 169; mental hospitals, 1970 223–7; New Skin for the Old Ceremony tour 271–4, 276–9; Newport Folk Festival, 1967 160, 163–5; Recent Songs tour 307–11, 410–11; Rheingold Festival, New York, 1967 165; Songs From a Room tour 216–31; Songs of Love and Hate tour 245–50; State University of New York, Buffalo, 1967 160, 178; The Future tour 372–4, 382, 384, 413, 450, 453, 464; Various Positions tour 325–8; warm-up shows, 2008, Canada 460, 458, 459–64; world tour, 2008–10 464–74, 477–81, 482–4, 489, 490, 492, 496, 502, 504; world tour, 2012–13 504

DEATH 506–9

FILM/TV APPEARANCES see under individual film or television programme name

FINANCES: book sales and 138, 139, 316; buys house on Hydra 81–2; concert ticket sales and 187, 452, 474, 476; grants 71–2, 77, 89, 102, 128; inheritance/ legacies 81, 139; lack of money on Hydra 88–9, 111, 138–9; record deals and 160, 316, 429 see also under individual album name; theft of money from accounts 422–4, 425–31, 434–5, 482–3, 483n

MUSICAL CAREER/TALENT: albums see ALBUMS; concerts see CONCERTS; first band 39–42, 40; first songs, learns 30–1; guitar playing 30–2, 42, 44, 48, 61, 65, 69, 114, 137, 138, 145, 147, 148, 158, 159, 178, 181, 184, 204, 238, 263, 271, 274, 317–18, 321, 323, 324, 331, 404, 461, 490, 492; keyboard playing 311, 317–18, 321, 324, 338, 352, 358, 360, 408; method of learning songs 42–3; publishing/rights to songs 169–70, 171, 238, 343, 424, 425, 426, 427, 456; song writing method 44; song writing, birth of 130, 136–46; songs see songs; voice 29, 56, 57, 137, 138, 170, 184, 191–2, 202, 205, 206, 233, 238, 286, 321, 322, 332, 337, 339, 346, 360, 368, 392, 393, 410–11, 412, 414, 415, 419, 445, 447–8, 454, 459, 461, 477, 487, 490–1, 493, 498

POEMS AND POETRY COLLECTIONS: ‘A Kite Is A Victim’ 98; ‘Alexander Trocchi, Public Junkie, Priez Pour Nous’ 101; ‘As The Mist Leaves No Scar’ 99, 286, 441; ‘Avalanche’ 139; ‘Before the Story’ 99; Book of Longing 82, 388, 390n, 396n, 416, 418, 422, 430, 431, 435–6, 437, 440–1, 444, 446–7, 455, 505, 509; ‘Celebration’ 98, 190, 220; ‘Credo’ 98; ‘Cuckold’s Song’ 99; ‘Days Of Kindness’ 374; ‘Early Morning At Mount Baldy’ 437; The Energy of Slaves 197, 241–3, 247, 256; ‘Fingerprints’ 139; Flowers for Hitler 92, 101, 116–20, 139, 255, 259; ‘Folk Song’ 47, 48n; ‘For Anne’ 61, 62, 98; ‘For Wilf And His House’ 48, 56; ‘How We Used To Approach the Book of Changes’ 242–3; ‘I Long To Hold Some Lady’ 98; ‘I Miss My Mother’ 436; ‘I See You On A Greek Mattress’ 82; ‘I Try To Keep In Touch Wherever I Am’ 210; ‘If It Were Spring’ 98; ‘It Swings Jocko’ 104; ‘It Takes A Long Time To See You Terez’ 197; ‘I’m Always Thinking Of A Song For Anjani To Sing’ 476–7; ‘Last Dance at the Four Penny’ 69; ‘Layton’s Question’ 438; ‘Le Vieux’ 47, 56; Let Us Compare Mythologies 50, 52, 53–6, 58, 99, 183; ‘Letter’ 54; ‘Lines From My Grandfather’s Journal’ 98, 99; ‘Lovers’ 54, 56; ‘Master Song’ 139, 372; ‘Mission’ 509; ‘My Honour’ 334; ‘My Time’ 437; ‘Never Once’ 437; ‘Not A Jew’ 390, 390n, 437, 438–9; ‘Other Writers’ 437–8; Parasites of Heaven 82, 139; ‘Priests 1957’ 98; ‘Queen Victoria And Me’ 255; ‘Rites’ 53; ‘Robert Appears Again’ 436; ‘Satan In Westmount’ 47–8; Selected Poems 1956–68 3, 119, 189, 195, 212, 371; ‘Sparrows’ 48, 56; The Spice-Box of Earth 61, 62, 65n, 76–7, 89, 91–2, 96–7, 98–100, 102, 104, 115, 116, 118, 286, 419, 441, 446; Stranger Music: Selected Poems and Songs 371–2, 374; ‘Suzanne’ 123–4, 139, 314, 351, 355, 372; ‘Teachers’ 139; ‘Terez And Deanne’ 197; ‘The Genius’ 99; ‘The Gift’ 65, 65n; ‘The Girl Toy’ 98; ‘The Mist Of Pornography’ 437; ‘The New Step’ 259; ‘The Only Tourist In Havana Turns His Thoughts Homeward’ 92; ‘The Reason I Write’ 3; ‘There Are Some Men’ 446; ‘Thoughts Of A Landsman’ 48; ‘Thousand Kisses Deep’ 436; ‘Titles’ 437; ‘When I Uncovered Your Body’ 220; ‘Who Do You Really Remember’ 436

PROSE: ‘A Ballet of Lepers’ (unpublished) 62–3, 67, 109; Beautiful Losers 64, 103, 104, 127–30, 131, 133–6, 137, 138, 139, 143, 145, 151, 152–3, 187, 189, 195, 224, 276, 297, 313, 372; Book of Mercy 309, 312–15, 316, 322; ‘Ceremonies’ (unpublished) 15, 17; Death of a Lady’s Man 239, 259n, 282, 285, 292, 295–7; ‘The End of My Life In Art’ (unpublished) 276; ‘Enough of Fallen Heroes’ (TV script) 91; Favourite Game, The 12, 15–16, 20, 25, 30, 38, 51n, 61, 63, 72, 73, 74, 75, 91, 105, 108, 109–10, 111–12, 117, 120, 127, 128, 132, 134, 185, 237, 297, 349, 372, 416; ‘The Famous Havana Diary’ (unpublished) 94, 109; first (father’s bow tie) 16, 56; ‘Kill or be Killed’ (unpublished) 28, 77; ‘Lights on the Black Water’ (later retitled ‘Light on Dark Water’) (TV script) 91; ‘My Sister’s Birthday’ (unpublished) 15; ‘The Juke-Box Heart: Excerpt From A Journal’ (unpublished) 25–6; ‘The Shaving Ritual’ (unpublished) 58; ‘The Woman Being Born’/‘My Life In Art’ (unpublished) 239, 259, 274, 277–8, 295, 296; Trade (play) 91

RELIGIOUS/SPIRITUAL LIFE: Buddhism see Buddhism; Christianity and 48, 187, 279, 300, 315; Hinduism and 396–400, 401, 402, 410; I Ching and 82, 84, 103, 167, 296; funeral and 509; Jewish religion and 7, 9, 16, 23–4, 38, 74, 81, 98, 116–17, 118–20, 176, 245–6, 249–50, 261, 270–1, 272–3, 300, 309, 310, 314–15, 321, 348, 390, 400, 403, 437, 438–40, 466, 505, 509; LC on Mount Baldy, L.A. 502; ‘messianic childhood’ 72, 78; messianic complex 96, 129; Scientology, Church of and 195–6, 200, 213, 216

SONGS: ‘A Bunch of Lonesome Heroes’ 99, 207; ‘A Singer Must Die’ 269; ‘A Thousand Kisses Deep’ 363, 391, 411, 436, 464; ‘Ain’t No Cure For Love’ 331, 332, 340; ‘Alexandra Leaving’ 411; ‘Almost Like the Blues’ 505; ‘Amen’ 493; ‘Angel Eyes’ 328, 328n; ‘Anthem’ 323, 338, 363, 367, 369, 370, 375, 413; ‘Anyhow’ 493; ‘Arms Of Regina’ 225; ‘As the Mist Leaves No Scar’ 99, 108, 286, 441; ‘Avalanche’ 139, 200, 235, 332, 339, 361, 372, 457, 478; ‘Baby I’ve Seen You’ 202; ‘Ballad Of The Absent Mare’ 209, 303; ‘Beach Of Idios’ 177; ‘Beauty Salon’ 274, 284; ‘Because Of’ 419; ‘Billy Sunday’ 304; ‘Bird On The Wire’ 48n, 191, 192, 200, 205–6, 225, 226, 239, 240, 250, 306, 331, 359–60, 413, 468, 471; ‘Blessed Is The Memory’ 177, 471; ‘Blue Alert’ 442; ‘Boogie Street’ 411–12, 462; ‘Born In Chains’ 478, 486, 505; ‘Breakdown’ 202; ‘By The Rivers Dark’ 411; ‘Came So Far For Beauty’ 274; ‘Chant’ 136; ‘Chelsea Hotel #1’ 189–90, 210, 361; ‘Chelsea Hotel #2’ 190, 210, 226, 262, 270, 312, 316, 349, 468; ‘Closing Time’ 367, 370, 441; ‘Crazy to Love You’ 486, 492; ‘Dance Me To The End Of Love’ 317, 318, 324–5, 456, 459; ‘Death Of A Ladies’ Man’ 291, 295; ‘Democracy’ 359, 368–9; ‘Diamonds In the Mine’ 235, 274, 277; ‘Different Sides’ 486, 492; ‘Do I Have To Dance All Night’ 304; ‘Don’t Go Home With Your Hard-On’ 284, 287–8, 415, 432, 444; ‘Dress Rehearsal Rag’ 135n, 143–4, 169, 235, 268, 471; ‘Everybody Knows’ 338, 339, 340, 360, 487; ‘Famous Blue Raincoat’ 226, 235, 239, 331, 332–3, 440; ‘Feels So Good’ 473, 486; ‘Fingerprints’ 139, 290, 291; ‘First We Take Manhattan’ 331, 337–8, 340–1, 361; ‘Go No More A-Roving’ 418–19; ‘Going Home’ 488–9, 493; ‘Goodnight’ 269; ‘Guerrero’ 274, 285, 291, 301; ‘Hallelujah’ 99, 125, 319–21, 323, 324, 325, 328–30, 361, 389, 405, 430, 433, 434, 441, 456, 465–6, 467, 470, 476, 477; ‘Heart With No Companion’ 319; ‘Hey, That’s No Way To Say Goodbye’ 145, 157, 161, 164, 179, 182, 239, 361, 440; ‘Hunter’s Lullaby’ 319; ‘I Can’t Forget’ 338, 340, 361, 505; ‘I Guess It’s Time’ 276, 287, 293; ‘I’m Your Man’ 431, 473; ‘If I Didn’t Have Your Love’ 508; ‘If It Be Your Will’ 309, 321–2, 323, 324, 327, 432, 464; ‘Improvisation’ 256; ‘In the Middle Of The Night’ 177; ‘Iodine’ 284, 286; ‘Joan Of Arc’ 54, 155, 231, 234, 235, 236, 239, 330, 331, 371, 443; ‘Just Two People’ (aka ‘Anyone Can See’) 177, 202; ‘Lady Midnight’ 191, 192; ‘Last Year’s Man’ 233, 234, 242; ‘Leaving Green Sleeves’ 266; ‘Leaving the Table’ 508; ‘Light As The Breeze’ 369; ‘Love Is The Item’ 177, 178; ‘Love Itself’ 411; ‘Lover Lover Lover’ 261, 262, 264, 272, 274; ‘Lullaby In Blue’ 391; ‘Lullaby’ 471, 486, 492; ‘Master Song’ 139, 157, 169, 184, 372; ‘Memories’ 155, 284, 286, 294, 312; ‘Minute Prologue’ 255; ‘Morning Glory’ 419; ‘Nancy, Where Have You Been Sleeping’ 177; ‘Never Any Good’ 392; ‘Never Got To Love You’ 440, 441; ‘Night Comes On’ 319; ‘Nightingale’ 419, 441–2; ‘Nine Years Old’/‗The Story of Isaac’ 169, 207; ‘No One After You’ 441; ‘Nobody Calls You But Me’ 177; ‘Nothing To One’ 191, 192, 471; ‘Nylon and Silk’ 322–3; ‘On That Day’ 419, 421; ‘One Of Us Cannot Be Wrong’ 155, 183, 185, 225, 355; ‘Our Lady of Solitude’ 302; ‘Paper-Thin Hotel’ 284, 291; ‘Passing Thru’ 256, 480; ‘Please Don’t Pass Me By (A Disgrace)’ 255–6; ‘Priests’ 145; ‘Puppets’ 486; ‘Samson in New Orleans’ 505; ‘Seems So Long Ago, Nancy’ 206–7, 227, 432; ‘Show Me The Place’ 493; ‘Sing Another Song, Boys’ 234, 235; ‘Sisters Of Mercy’ 126, 145, 178, 182, 185, 187, 238, 239; ‘Slow’ 505; ‘So Long, Marianne’ 126, 161, 177, 178, 182, 185, 194, 223, 239, 250, 361, 440, 473, 491; ‘Solidarity’ 231; ‘Song Of Bernadette’ 306, 331; ‘Splinters’ 177; ‘Store Room’ 177, 278, 471; ‘Stories Of The Street’ 208; ‘Summertime’ 308–9; ‘Suzanne’ 123–6, 139, 143, 144, 146, 147, 148, 154, 156, 157, 158, 159, 161, 163, 167, 169, 171, 177, 178, 179, 185, 191, 226, 231, 239, 312, 372, 393, 425, 443, 461, 477; ‘Tacoma Trailer’ 358, 415; ‘Take This Longing’ 155, 262; ‘Take This Waltz’ 333, 338; ‘Teachers’ 136, 139, 182, 185; ‘Tennessee Waltz’ 418; ‘Thanks For The Dance’ 441, 442, 486; ‘That Don’t Make It Junk’ 408; ‘The Bells’ 155, 262; ‘The Butcher’ 207, 304; ‘The Captain’ 319, 486; ‘The Darkness’ 473, 486, 492, 493; ‘The Faith’ 304, 418; ‘The Future’ 365, 368, 370, 393, 461, 464, 473; ‘The Great Event’ 392; ‘The Guests’ 302, 303, 312; ‘The Gypsy’s Wife’ 302, 304, 312; ‘The Jewels In Your Shoulder’ 155, 157, 160, 177, 178; ‘The Letters ‘419; ‘The Partisan’ 31n, 200, 202, 206, 231, 326, 328; ‘The Smokey Life’ 301, 304; ‘The Stranger Song’ 138, 143–4, 157, 159, 161, 170, 173n, 182, 185–6, 238, 318, 355, 457; ‘The Street’ 486, 492, 505; ‘The Sun Is My Son’ 177; ‘The Traitor’ 302, 304; ‘The Window’ 302, 303, 303n, 308; ‘There For You’ 419; ‘There Is A War’ 260, 264, 274; ‘There’s No Reason Why You Should Remember Me’ 194; ‘Tonight Will Be Fine’ 206, 225–6, 239; ‘Tower Of Song’ 338, 339, 340, 351, 361, 443, 444, 455, 480, 506; ‘Traitor Song’ 274; ‘Treaty’ 486, 508; ‘True Love Leaves No Traces’ 99, 286, 441; ‘Undertow’ 421; ‘Villanelle For Our Time’ 400, 418; ‘Waiting For The Miracle’ 338–9, 356, 367, 370, 405; ‘Whither Thou Goest’ 450, 466–7, 486; ‘Who By Fire’ 270, 351, 470; ‘Why Don’t You Try’ 264, 269; ‘Winter Lady’ 167, 177, 182, 238; ‘You Know Who I Am’ 177, 225, 256, 471; ‘You Want It Darker’ 509; ‘Your Father Has Fallen’ 157; ‘Your Private Name’ 202

Cohen, Lorca (daughter) 375; birth 268, 271; childhood 269, 271, 297, 298, 309, 312, 348; daughter and 487; dog 495, 497; Hanukkah with LC 467; joins LC on tour 488; Kelley Lynch and 422–3, 426; lives with LC in Los Angeles 356–7, 404; Mumbai with LC 409; Rufus Wainwright and 432, 487; Sabbath with LC 427; Stranger Music: Selected Poems and Songs dedicated to 371–2

Cohen, Lyon (grandfather) 6–7, 9, 36, 445

Cohen, Masha (mother) 51, 60, 62, 63, 114, 115, 127, 131, 190, 213, 269, 366, 402, 408, 485; advises LC to be careful of people in New York 169, 424; advises LC to have a shave when things get tough 133, 250, 458; at LC’s concerts 168; death 292, 294, 295, 297, 302, 319, 436, 437; depression 69–70, 117; dramatic character 44; ‘Famous Blue Raincoat’, likes 333; Jewish character 49; LC, attachment to 49; LC’s childhood and 4, 7, 8–9, 14, 15, 17, 19–20, 21, 22, 22, 24, 25, 25, 27, 32, 32–3, 58–9; LC’s first band and 41; LC’s possession of father’s gun, dislikes 45; LC’s visit to Cuba and 95, 97; Marianne Ihlen and 91; on Hydra 108, 149; Suzanne Elrod and 216; ‘The Donkey Serenade’, love of 498–9, 504

Cohen, Nathan (father) 95, 98; death 15, 16–17, 21, 24, 30, 41, 45, 50, 53–4, 56, 58, 70, 77, 109–10, 131, 156, 207, 213, 281, 282, 436, 443, 481; gun 9, 45, 78, 296; LC’s childhood and 4, 5, 6, 7–8, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 230, 239, 485

Cohen, Phil 63, 64

Cohen, Rabbi Tzvi Hirsch 6

Cole, Lloyd 361

Coleman, Ornette 240

Collins, Judy 107, 123, 140, 141, 142–6, 143, 150, 152, 153, 156, 157, 158–9, 159n, 164, 165, 171, 191, 195, 215, 233, 236, 239, 331, 376, 381, 449, 477

Collins, Phil 389

Columbia Records 156, 157, 158, 160, 161, 170, 171, 175, 180, 184, 191, 192, 201, 213, 216, 217, 234, 236, 238, 243, 255, 263, 264, 265, 292, 306–7, 323, 324, 330, 341, 372, 391, 392, 489

The Columbia Records Radio Hour Presents: Leonard Cohen Live! 372

Columbia University, New York 52, 56, 57, 58, 66, 97, 100, 171, 174

Concrete Blonde 360

Congregation Shaar Hashomayim, Montreal 6–7, 16, 49, 509

Consciousness Speaks (Balsekar) 396

Conspiracy of Beards 329

Cooke, Sam 408

Cornelius, Ron 202, 203, 205, 208–9, 210, 217, 220, 221, 224, 227, 235, 243, 246, 262, 316

Corso, Gregory 83

Cowell, Simon 329

Cream 244

Crill, Chester 179, 180, 181–2, 238–9

Crooks, Richard 317, 325

Crosby, David 167, 168, 191–2, 471

Crosby, Stills & Nash 141n, 191

Crowder, John 317, 325, 327

Cuba 67, 92–7, 93, 97, 100, 107, 261

Cullman, Brian 240, 244

Culture 70–1

Cyrcle 175, 179

Dabrowski, Stina 391–2

Daley, Sandy 198

Daniels, Charlie 200–1, 202, 204, 205, 217, 219–20, 230, 234, 243

Darrow, Chris 179–81, 238, 388

Dass, Ram 127

David Letterman Show, The 317, 372

Davis, Angela 107

Davis, Clive 160, 330

Davis, Dean 41

Davis, Janet 41–2

Davis, Miles 162–3, 228, 415, 454

Davis, Terry 39, 40, 41

De Mornay, Rebecca 355–9, 362–4, 365, 366, 367, 368, 370–1, 373–4, 373, 375, 381, 382, 384–5, 405, 411, 437, 479

DeCurtis, Anthony 186

Details 358

Dexter, Jeff 229, 230

Diamond, Neil 329

Dickins, Erin 271, 321

Dixon, Humphrey 257

Dixon, Sean 352–3, 354

Djwa, Sandra 119

Doddman, Mike 39, 40, 41

Donaldson, Allan 55

‘The Donkey Serenade’ 498–9, 504

Donovan 142, 215, 228

Donovan, Bill 210, 217, 220, 223, 225, 226–7, 243, 247, 262

Dubro, Alec 207

Dudek, Louis 39, 44, 46, 47, 49, 53, 54, 56, 70–1, 99, 110, 136, 376

Duets (Elton John) 373

Dunn’s Birdland, Montreal 64, 65, 120, 137

Duquende 491

Dylan, Bob: Anthology of American Folk Music and 197; Baez and 158; Bob Johnston and 201, 203, 204; Chelsea Hotel and 155; conversion to Christianity 300; ‘Hallelujah’ and 320, 329; John Hammond and 157, 170; Judy Collins and 142; LC as fan of 136–7; LC comparisons with 145, 161, 182, 184–5, 186, 192, 195, 207, 271, 294, 351; LC’s letters from 430, 506; LC’s meetings with 221, 273, 277–8, 286, 287–8, 320, 321; lyrics 182, 184–5; management 141; Nico and 150, 153, 179; Rolling Thunder tour 277–8, 286

Dylan, Sara 278, 288

Eavis, Michael 465, 466

Egoyan, Atom 487

Elektra Records 141, 151, 156, 157, 164 Ellen, Mark 167–8

Elliot, Ramblin’ Jack 277, 278

Elrod, Suzanne: children and 245, 250–1, 258, 263, 268, 269, 297, 359; Death of a Ladies Man and 282, 283, 292, 293; France, life in 298–9, 310, 312; Hydra, life on 258–9, 258, 274–5, 279, 298; LC first meets 211, 213–16, 214, 219–20; LC’s finances and 316, 348; LC’s writings and 274–5, 295; leaves LC 292, 294, 297, 304, 307; Live Songs and 256; Marianne Ilhen and 258–9; Montreal with LC 213–16, 219–20, 231, 237, 239, 255, 277, 278; Mount Baldy with LC 279; Nashville with LC 244; novel 237; on LC’s depression 234; sues LC 348; Tennessee with LC 233; Yom Kippur War and 260

Elton John 234, 346, 373, 389

Entertainers, The (TV programme) 268

Ernie Game, The 173n

Esquire 487–8

Ethiopia 262, 264

Faggen, Robert 448

Faith, Crissie 321

Famous Blue Raincoat (Warnes) 331–2, 337, 341

Fass, Bob 144, 158

Fassbinder, Rainer Werner 239

Fata Morgana (movie) 239

Feldman, Rona 23, 24, 25

Feldman, Sam 434, 451

Feldthouse, Solomon 179, 180

Felix, Julie 215

Fiddlehead 49, 55, 461

Field, Hazel 305, 308

Fields, Danny 151, 153, 154n, 155, 164–5, 171–2, 175, 217, 239, 272, 370

Finley, Rabbi Mordecai 315, 438–9, 508

The First Great Rock Festivals of the Seventies: Isle of Wight/Atlanta Pop Festival 241

Flack, Roberta 309

Flamingo, Soho, London 75–6

Folkways 56

Forge, The 39, 48, 52

Foundation for Public Poetry 469

Four Penny Art Gallery, The, Montreal 69–70

Fowler, Aileen 243n

Fowler, Elkin ‘Bubba’ 202, 217, 220, 243

Fox, Inez 140

France 12, 206, 220, 222–3, 298, 299, 309, 310, 313, 328n, 373, 391

Francis, Black 360–1

Freedman Company, The 4, 8, 15, 64, 71

Frizzell, Lefty 206

Frost, Robert 66

Fry, Stephen 487

Frye, Northrop 97

Fulford, Robert 168

Furey, Lewis 263, 264, 265, 311–12, 328

Furgo, Bob 343, 372

Gabriel, Peter 346, 389

Gainsbourg, Serge 150, 150, 362, 419

Gallagher, Bill 157–8

Gayol, Rafael 454

George, Wally 355

Gerde’s, Greenwich Village 147

Gesser, Sam 56

Getman, Ron 317, 325, 327

Gingras, Philippe 122

Ginn, Bill 305, 366, 372, 382

Ginsberg, Allen 56, 57, 83, 100, 176, 198, 273, 277, 287, 288, 300, 376, 413, 430, 446, 491

Glass, Philip 446–9, 451

Globe and Mail 134, 315

Glover, Dana 492

Godfrey, Arthur 160, 181–2

Gods, Gangsters and Honour (Machat) 292

Goldstein, Richard 127

Goren, Yoav 366

Gotlieb, Phyllis 127

Grass, Günter 119, 489

Greenberg, Neal 427, 428, 431, 482, 483

Greenwich Village, New York 56, 58, 65, 100, 141, 144, 147, 167

Gregory, Dick 107

Grossman, Albert 141, 150

Groves, Lani 321

Guardian 110, 219, 271, 337

Guevara, Che 92

Gustafson, Ralph 136

Guthrie, Arlo 197

Guthrie, Woody 31, 157, 182, 197

Guttman, Freda 42, 53, 113

Hadjikyriakos-Ghikas, Nikos 79

Hakopian, Raffi 302, 303, 305, 338, 409

Hallet, Rob 452–3, 457, 458, 462, 474

Hammond, John 156–8, 160, 161, 162, 169, 170, 175, 176, 177, 178, 202, 264, 330

Hampstead, London 72–4, 73, 77, 105, 333

Hancock, Herbie 451, 476

Handsome Family 413

Hank the cat 352–4, 353

Hanney, Corlynn 217, 230, 245n

Hansard, Glen 491

Hardin, Tim 153, 239

Hare Krishnas 176, 177, 216, 222

Harrison, Noel 171, 195

Havana, Cuba 92–7, 93, 100, 107, 109

Hébert, Bernar 111–12, 416

Heft, Melvin 42

Hegarty, Antony 432–3

Henderson Hospital, Sutton 223–6

Hendrix, Jimi 154–5, 156, 164, 228, 229, 231

Henley, Don 389

Henske, Judy 141

Hershorn, Robert 42, 43, 106, 113, 131, 140, 141, 303

Herzog, Werner 239

Hester, Carolyn 141

High Times 305

Hillel the Elder 42, 392

Hinduism 396–400, 401, 402, 410

Holland, Jools 351

Holocaust 54, 118, 256, 318n, 340

Holzman, Jac 141, 142, 144

Hope For Haiti telethon 329, 476

Hopper, Dennis 226–7

Howl (Ginsberg) 56

Hubbard, L. Ron 196

Hudson, Garth 157, 302

Hutchinson, Barbara 79

Hydra, Greece 79–90, 85, 88, 89, 102, 103–5, 108, 111, 112, 127–8, 129, 131, 139, 145, 159–60, 173, 174, 175, 187, 193–4, 201, 208, 215, 234, 258–60, 258, 261–2, 274–5, 275, 277–8, 277, 279, 281, 293, 295, 298, 308, 311–12, 365, 373, 374, 388, 403, 401, 478; Irving Layton on 88, 89; LC arrives on 79–81; LC buys house on 81–2; LC finishes The Favourite Game on 108; LC meets Dominique Isserman and 312; LC no longer goes to 478; LC plays host to mother on 108; LC writes Beautiful Losers on 127–30, 131; LC’s lifestyle on 102, 274–5; LC’s love for 81–2, 83, 194; Marianne Ihlen, LC meets on 85–90; Songs from a Room sleeve and 293; Suzanne Elrod on 215, 258–9, 258, 274–5, 279, 293, 298

I am a Hotel (short musical film) 312

I Ching 82, 84, 103, 167, 296

I’m Your Fan (tribute album) 361–2, 389

Ibiza 143

Iggy Pop 154n, 335, 336, 336

Ihlen, Marianne 293, 333, 507; Alex Jensen and 83, 84, 86–7, 91; attends tours 478; child 84, 85, 87–8, 90, 91, 108, 159, 174; ‘Dress Rehearsal Rag’ and 236; drug taking with LC 103, 129, 131; finances 111; first meets LC on Hydra 84–9, 85, 88; Flowers for Hitler and 118; Hydra, life on 103, 104, 105, 111, 129, 131, 145, 193–4, 233, 258–9, 374, 478; LC’s break with 225, 258–9; LC’s debut live performance, on 159–60; LC’s involvement with other women and 104–5, 114–15, 121; LC’s poetry and 98, 189, 371, 374; Montreal 90, 91, 95, 108, 112; New York 174–5; on LC’s song writing ambitions 137, 147, 148; on LC’s working habits 129; ‘So Long, Marianne’ and 126, 161, 177, 178, 182, 185, 194, 223, 239, 250, 361, 440, 473, 491; Suzanne Elrod and 121, 216, 258–9; The Favourite Game dedicated to 117

In Concert 372

In Praise of Older Women (Vizinczey) 110

Independent 372, 494

India 396–400, 402, 404, 410, 436

Interview 370–1

IRS 426

Israel 77, 79–80, 163, 167, 243, 247–8, 260–3, 308–9, 343, 398, 470, 479

Israeli Army 260–2

Issermann, Dominique 311, 312, 333–4, 348, 370, 479, 495

Jackson, Mahalia 89–90

James 363

Jensen, Axel (son of Axel Jensen) 84, 85, 87–8, 90, 91, 108, 159, 174

Jensen, Axel 83, 84, 86–7, 91

Joel, Billy 389

Johnson, Jean 365

Johnston, Bob 160, 161, 192, 193, 200–4, 205, 206, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223–4, 227, 229, 231, 234, 235, 238, 243, 244, 245, 248, 250, 255, 271, 302, 471

Johnston, George 80, 81, 83, 86, 87, 111, 193, 215

Jonathan Cape 135

Jones, Brian 150

Jones, George 208

Joplin, Janis 147, 156, 175, 189–91, 226, 231, 262, 432

Joyce, James 39, 110, 112, 135, 187

Jung, Carl 103, 124, 269

Juno Awards: 1992 367; 2001 412, 506

Juno Hall of Fame, Canada 364

Kabbalah 249–50, 314, 438–40

Kaleidoscope 179–82, 238, 302n, 388

Karajan, Herbert von 272

Kaye, Maury 64, 65, 418

Keats, John 54, 72

Kennedy, John F. 92, 351

Kennedy, Robert 196

Kent State Massacre, 1970 219

Kerouac, Jack 56–7

Kerry (gardener) 5

Kessel, Barney 283

Kessel, Dan 283–4, 286–7, 288, 289, 290, 291

Kessel, David 283–4, 285, 286–7, 288, 289

Kigen 379, 387, 391

King, Bobby 331

King, Martin Luther 196, 282

Kingsmill, Anthony 83, 279, 310

Klein, A. M. 56, 98, 120, 419

Klein, Allen 217

Klein, Larry 438

Kleinow, Pete 338

Klonitzki-Kline, Rabbi Solomon (grandfather) 8, 9, 38, 62, 74, 97, 98–9, 439

Knight, Frederick 366

Kooper, Al 164

Kory, Robert 405, 426, 427–8, 429, 430, 431, 451, 452, 453, 457, 458, 462, 463, 464, 468, 470, 482

Kot, Greg 494

Krall, Diana 434

Kristofferson, Kris 147, 190, 206, 229, 243, 376, 428

Kubernik, Harvey 273, 287, 293, 301

L. Cohen and Son 6

Ladies and Gentlemen … Mr Leonard Cohen (documentary) 131–3, 135, 136, 157, 218

Landau, Jon 455

Lang, k. d. 329, 434

Lang, Penny 147

Langlois, Christine 435

Larsen, Neil 454, 464

Las Vegas 481–2, 481

Later … with Jools Holland (TV programme) 373

Laure, Carol 311

Laurentians, Canada 21–2, 33, 60, 61, 68

Layton, Aviva 49–51, 59, 60, 61, 65, 66, 67, 81, 89, 111n, 126–7, 156, 165, 279

Layton, Irving: admiration for LC 50–1, 65, 66, 136, 308, 375; appearance 45, 60, 88, 89; as one of LC’s heroes 480; background 45; Book of Longing dedicated to 435, 438; character 45; death 433–4; drug taking 126–7; ‘Go No More A-Roving’ dedicated to 418; health 401, 409–10; on Hydra 88, 89, 279; LC’s friendship with 45–6, 50–1, 71, 94, 156, 239; on LC’s hedonism and yearnings for sainthood 68; Montreal poetry scene and 46–7, 48, 55, 56, 58, 69, 71, 96, 99, 113, 120; old age 401, 409–10; on qualities most important for a young poet 183; Recent Songs dedicated to 305; Six Day War and 163; Song of Leonard Cohen and 307; The Spice-Box of Earth and 76, 98, 102; TV scripts with LC, writes 89, 91; wife and see Layton, Aviva

Layton, Jeff 265, 271

Lazarowitz, Barry 265

Le Bistro, Montreal 113, 120, 121, 131, 189, 231

Leachman, Cloris 429

Lead Belly 31

Leary, Timothy 83, 127

Lee, Dennis 110–11, 313

Lennon, John 107, 282, 283, 294, 415

Leonard Cohen You’re Our Man: 75 Poets Reflect on the Poetry of Leonard Cohen 469 Leonard Cohen: Drawn To Words (exhibition) 447, 449

Leonard Cohen: I’m Your Man (film) 433, 443–4

Leonard Cohen: Portrait, Spring 1996 (TV documentary) 391

Leonard, Patrick 488–9, 492, 504

Leonardcohenfiles.com 393–4, 422

Lerner, Murray 229, 231

Lerner, Yafa ‘Bunny’ 42

Les Inrockuptibles 360, 361

Lesser, Gene 259

Levi, Oshik 260, 261

Levi, Primo 118

Levine, Larry 290

Lewy, Henry 300–1, 302, 306, 316, 344, 408–9, 418

Lialios, George 84, 103

Liberty 198, 251–2

Life 208

Lindley, David 179, 180, 182, 331

Lindsey, Charles 430

Lindsey, Steve 366, 389, 428–9

Lissauer, John 263–7, 271, 272, 273–4, 276–7, 278, 279–80, 282, 284, 300, 301, 304, 305, 316–18, 321, 322–3, 324, 325, 328, 405, 418, 442, 443, 469

Lithuania 6, 8, 326, 448

Lochhead, Douglas 97

Locke, Jack 469

London 66, 68, 71, 231; the Flamingo, Soho 75–6; Hampstead 72–4, 73, 77, 105, 333; LC concerts and poetry readings in 219–20, 223, 278, 449, 450, 452, 466–7, 471, 495; LC first lives in, 1959 71, 72–7, 73, 91, 105; LC returns to, 1962 105–8; LC watches Bird on a Wire in 256–7, 263; LC’s BBC appearances in 194, 195; Nico in 150, 219; Songs of Love and Hate and 234, 235; Trocchi in 101

London Black Power Movement 106

Loog Oldham, Andrew 150

Lorca, Federico García 28–9, 30, 54, 77, 92, 167, 168, 268, 333, 338, 341, 469, 480, 490–1

Lorca, Laura García 490, 491

Los Angeles 167–8, 175, 191, 192, 193–4, 211, 231, 252, 403, 405, 406, 427, 428, 432, 433, 438, 448, 456, 475–6, 483, 495–6, 497–9; Brentwood house, LC rents 279–80, 283, 294; Death of a Ladies Man recorded in 281–92; healing of Hank the cat in 352–4, 353; LC and Iggy Pop in 335; LC attends synagogue in 438; LC concerts in 272–3, 328; LC’s reasons for living in 365, 475–6, 495–6; Mount Baldy 252–3, 279, 291, 295, 299–300, 310, 377–96, 378, 400–1, 406, 416, 419, 437, 448, 496; The Future recorded in 365–7; Zen Center, Cimarron Street 175, 211, 252, 279, 299, 300, 357, 365, 377, 380, 385, 386, 391, 403, 448, 476, 496

Los Angeles Times 294

Lumet, Sidney 370

Lunson, Lian 433, 443, 449

Lynch, Kelley 343, 364, 366–7, 389, 404, 413, 422–4, 425–31, 435, 452, 482–3, 483n

Macdonald, Brian 220

Machat & Machat 342–3

Machat, Marty 217, 244–5, 256–7, 264–5, 272, 282, 287, 292, 304, 316–17, 323, 342, 343, 452

Machat, Steven 292, 297, 342–3, 452, 479

Maclean’s 298, 328, 370, 464

MacLennan, Hugh 44–5

Magerman, Alfie 30–1

Maharaj, Nisargadatta 396

Mailer, Norman 100, 101

Mamas and the Papas 226

Manson, Charles 211, 368

Mapplethorpe, Robert 156, 198

Marchese, Robert 273

Markowtiz, Roy 265

Marley, Ray ‘Kid’ 208–10, 215, 218, 303

Marom, Malka 268, 287

Marshall, Peter 243, 247–8, 250

Martin, Gavin 68

Martin, Mary 141, 142, 156, 157, 160, 169

Mary (maid) 5, 10

Mary Martin Management Inc. 160

Mas, Javier 454, 462, 467, 469, 491

Maschler, Tom 135

Mathur, Ratnesh 398, 399, 400, 401, 470–1

Max’s Kansas City 151

May, Derek 113, 131, 137

Mayer, Ira 346, 348

McClelland, Jack 76, 91, 94, 97, 110–11, 112, 115–16, 117–18, 129, 130, 134–5, 213, 312–13, 422

McCoy, Charlie 202, 204

McCulloch, Ian 332, 361

McGarrigle, Kate and Anna 413

McGill Daily 54

McGill University, Montreal 34–52, 53, 54, 55, 57, 58, 59, 63, 64, 110, 112, 113, 132, 220, 374, 400

McGinnis, Sid 317

McGuinn, Roger 277

McGuinness, Sid 278

McMorran, Tom 343

Meador, Steve 305, 343, 372

Medley, Bill 330

Melody Maker 186, 187, 237, 257, 270, 279 Merlin 100

Merrick, Gordon 83

Merton, Thomas 266–7

Metzger, Bob 343, 372, 373, 407, 454

Miami Vice (TV programme) 333

Michael X 105–7

Miles, Barry 100

Miller, Arthur 155, 469, 489

Miller, Henry 79

Miller, John 265, 271, 278–9, 304

Miller, Merle 321

Milne, Ian 225

Mingus, Charles 362

Mitchell, Joni 140, 154, 164, 165, 166, 167–8, 191, 273, 277, 278, 300, 301, 302, 430, 434, 438, 451, 476, 479

Montreal Gazette 138, 188

Montreal Royals 30

Montreal, Canada 75, 88, 213, 428, 432, 443, 464, 469, 470, 475, 483; Adam Cohen born in 250–1; Bob Dylan Rolling Thunder tour in 277, 286; Dunn’s Birdland 64–6, 120, 137; Expo ’67 160, 168–9; folk-music scene 147; 5th Dimension 113; 599 Belmont Avenue, Westmount 3, 5–6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 21, 24, 32, 44, 51, 62–3, 70, 96–7, 114, 167, 216, 294, 408, 490; The Four Penny Art Gallery 68–9; Hotel de France, Saint-Laurent Street 114; Irving Layton’s funeral in 433–4; Ladies and Gentleman … Mr Leonard Cohen filmed in 131–3; LC concerts in 160, 168–9, 227, 231, 464; LC meets Suzanne Verdal in 121–6; LC returns from Hydra to 88–90, 91, 92, 95, 111; LC takes Joni Mitchell to 167; LC takes LSD in 126–7; LC’s cottage near Parc du Portugal 216, 231, 251, 255, 263, 268, 278, 298, 308; LC’s ‘neurotic affiliations’ with 193; LC’s castigates Jewish community in 119–20; LC’s childhood/youth in 3–33; LC’s fame in 112, 475; LC’s first singing/poetry performances in 64–6; LC’s furnished duplex in west of 112, 132, 148; LC’s love for 112; LC’s mother’s death in 292, 294; LC’s Mountain Street apartment 63, 88–90; LC’s night ramblings in 25–7, 33, 47, 64; LC’s Stanley Street room 48–9, 68, 69; Le Bistro 112–13, 120, 121, 131, 189, 231; Le Vieux Moulin 121; Leonard Cohen Poet-in-Residence programme, Westmount High 469; Marianne Ihlen in 90, 95, 108, 137; McGill University 34–52, 53, 54, 55, 57, 58, 59, 63, 64, 110, 112, 113, 132, 220, 374, 400; Murray Hill Park 9, 24, 31–2, 490; Nelson Hotel 263; Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours 123, 125; Our Lady of The Harbour 123, 123; Roslyn Elementary School 9, 24; Sainte-Catherine Street 25, 42, 64, 101, 114; Some Kind of Record: Poems in Tribute to Leonard Cohen in 409; spring in 236–7; Suzanne Elrod in 216, 237, 239, 255, 263, 297, 298; Various Positions recording and 337; W.R. Cuthbert & Company, LC works at 63; Westmount 3–5, 7, 9–11, 12, 20–1, 22, 27, 31–2, 35, 37, 38, 45, 49, 51, 59, 73, 114, 132, 231; Westmount High School 9, 22–3, 23, 24, 28, 34, 36, 38, 469

Morris, Matt 329, 476

Morrison, Jim 154

Mount Baldy, L.A. 252–3, 279, 291, 295, 299–300, 310, 377–96, 378, 400–1, 406, 416, 419, 437, 448, 496, 502

A Moving Picture (television film) 351

McCabe and Mrs Miller (movie) 238–9

Mumbai, India 396–400, 402, 404, 410, 436

Music Row 201

Mussmano, Susan 217, 243, 243n

Nadel, Ira B. 136, 137

Napa State mental hospital 226

Nashville, Tennessee 129, 130, 140, 146, 193, 200–10, 211, 213, 216, 217–18, 231, 234, 244, 262, 296

Nashville (movie) 286

National Ballet of Canada 351

National Post 434

Native Americans 64, 130, 133

Natural Born Killers (movie) 370

Nelson, Willie 329, 389, 433, 434

Neuwirth, Bobby 277, 278

Neville Brothers 359–60

Neville, Aaron 359–60, 366, 389

The New Step (one-act ballet drama) 259

New York 49; Algonquin Hotel 309, 321; Beats in 57; Came So Far for Beauty tribute concert in, 2003 412–14, 416, 431; Chelsea Hotel 146, 154–5, 163, 165, 171, 175, 189–91, 196, 199–201, 213, 226, 251, 469, 469; Columbia University 52, 56, 57, 58, 66, 97, 100, 171, 174; El Quijote 154, 156, 174, 198, 199–200; Gaslight 217; Greenwich Village 56, 58, 65, 100, 141, 144, 147, 167; Henry Hudson Hotel 146, 175, 188, 189; International House, Riverside Drive 58; LC first lives in 56–62; LC concerts in 158–60, 165, 272, 273, 348, 381, 468, 471, 495; LC poetry reading, 92nd Street Y, 1959 71; LC poetry reading, 92nd Street Y, 1966 138; LC music career takes off in 140–7, 149–65, 170, 171–3; New Skin for the Old Ceremony recording in 263, 264, 267; 9/11 410; Paradox 198–9; Penn Terminal Hotel 140–1; Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction in, LC 455; Royalton Hotel 264, 274, 317, 322; Scene, The 164, 179–80; Scientology, LC dabbles with in 195–6, 198–9, 213, 216; Songs of Leonard Cohen recording in 160–5, 175–83; ‘Songs for Rebecca’ recording in 274, 277, 300; Songwriters Hall of Fame, LC induction in 477; Suzanne Elrod, LC first meets in 213–15; Various Positions recording in 316–18, 321, 322–3; Village Vanguard 56

New York Observer 410

New York Philharmonic 265

New York Post 346–7

New York Times 138, 165, 186, 187, 194–5, 207, 292, 293–4, 305, 342, 348, 374, 411, 452

New Yorker 505, 507

Nicholson, Ivy 173

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds 332, 361

Nico 149–55, 150n, 160, 165, 172, 179, 185, 199, 219, 231, 262, 284–5

Nietzsche, Friedrich 218

Night Magic (musical) 312, 328

Night Music (TV programme) 351 9/11 410, 419, 421

NME 270, 305, 324, 361

Nursie (LC’s nanny) 5, 15

O’Connor, David 243

O’Hara, Mary Margaret 443

Observer 186, 244, 410, 494

Ochs, Phil 140

Oldfield, Terry 259, 310–11

On the Road (Kerouac) 57

Onassis, Aristotle 87

Ondaatje, Michael 110, 115, 139, 195

Ono, Yoko 107

Orbison, Roy 356

Orlovsky, Peter 287

Orton, Beth 431

Ostermeyer, Paul 305, 372

Ostin, Mo 292

Ostrow, Harry 32–3

Owen, Don 127, 131, 173n

Pacey, Desmond 91

Page, Jimmy 150

Palestinian Prisoners Club 470

Palmer, Tony 186, 244–7, 256–7, 479

Palumbo, Edward 124

Paris, France 206, 220, 247, 272, 304, 312, 320, 332, 333, 334, 338, 365, 388, 495

Parks, Van Dyke 331

Parnass, Harry 60

Pascal, Harold 75

Passenger 301, 302, 305, 331, 344, 409

Paul, Steve 164, 179

‘Pauper Ego Sum’ (‘I Am A Poor Man’) 465

Paxton, Tom 158

Peacock, Ann 39

Peale, Norman Vincent 119

Peel, John 194

Pelieu, Claude 198

PEN New England Song Lyrics of Literary Excellence 495, 506

Penick, Doug 427

People 307

People’s Songbook, The 30, 31, 206

Peterson Memorial Prize 52

Phillips, Michelle 226, 415

Phoenix, The 59, 97

Piaf, Edith 64, 140, 480

Pixies 360, 361

Playboy 187

Plimpton, George 101

Poetas en Nueva York (compilation album) 333

Poland 12, 325–7, 328, 412, 422

Pomerance, Erica 112–15, 115n, 122, 168

Pomus, Doc 284, 351

Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, A (Joyce) 110

Presley, Elvis 140, 192

The Prince of Asturias Award for Letters, Spain 489–90

Priddy, Nancy 179

Pullman, Jake 73

Pullman, Stella 72, 73, 74, 76, 105, 107

Pump Up the Volume (movie) 360

Purdy, Al 136

Queen’s Quarterly 54

Rasky, Harry 125, 306, 307–8

Ray Vaughan, Stevie 331

Redding, Otis 408

Reed, Lou 135, 149, 151, 153, 443, 455

R.E.M. 36

Reiner, Ira 428

Rice, Damien 456

Rice, Michelle 426–7, 430–1, 483n

Richardson, Daphne 256

Richler, Mordecai 10, 21, 212–13

River: The Joni Letters (Joni Mitchell tribute album) 451, 476

Rix, Luther 278

Robbins, Marty 192, 201

Robbins, Tom 389

Robinson, Sharon 305–6, 308–9, 331, 339, 391, 402, 403, 404, 406–7, 408, 409, 410, 419, 442, 453, 454, 455, 456, 462, 465, 467, 486, 492

Robitaille, Devra 290

Rock Machine Turns You On, The (CBS sampler album) 187

Rodriguez, Juan 169

Rolling Stone 186, 207, 270, 272, 294, 305, 374, 455, 464, 468, 477, 494

Rolling Stones 136, 150, 217

Rolling Thunder tour, Dylan 277, 286

Rollins, Sonny 351, 352

Rosarium philosophorum 268–9

Rosengarten, Mort 20–2, 23, 24, 26–7, 27, 28, 33, 36, 37, 38, 42, 44, 46, 48–9, 58, 66, 68, 69, 70, 73, 80, 102, 110, 113, 131, 137, 217, 218, 228, 255, 277, 294, 475

Roshi Joshu Sasaki: alcohol and 211, 266, 381, 445, 476; appearance 211, 212; background 211; birthdays 364, 390, 445, 449, 487, 496; Book of Longing and 435, 437–8; death 505; Death of a Ladies Man, presence in studio during recording of 290–1, 303; heroes, as one of LC’s 77, 480; L.A., as reason for LC living in 279, 300, 385, 475–6, 496, 501; LC introduced to 83, 176–7, 211–12; LC on Mount Baldy with 252–3, 263, 276, 279, 299–300, 334, 378, 379, 380, 381, 385, 386, 394, 395, 396, 400–1, 403, 480–1, 496; LC ordained as a Buddhist monk and 390–1; LC’s depression and 349, 350, 395–6; LC’s finances and 316, 425–6; LC’s Judaism and 300, 308, 314, 438, 439; LC’s song writing and 332; New Skin for the Old Ceremony, presence in studio during recording of 266–7; old age 502–3; Philip Glass meets 448; Recent Songs tour, joins 306; Ten New Songs and 411, 412; Zen Center, Cimarron Street, Los Angeles and 175, 211, 252, 279, 299, 300, 307, 357, 365, 377, 380, 385, 386, 391, 403, 448, 476, 496; Zero and 300

Ross, Diana 309

Ross, Stan 289–90

Rothschild, Jacob 79

Rovina, Ilana 260

Royal Winnipeg Ballet 220

Ruff, Willie 162

Rumi 303

Sainte-Marie, Buffy 160, 195, 262

Saltzman, Paul 241, 244

Sanborn, David 351

Sanders, Ed 442, 478, 492

Sanfield, Steve 82, 83–5, 103, 175, 176–7, 211, 250–1, 252, 300, 390, 437

Sartre, Jean-Paul 100, 119

Saturday Review 110

Schulman, Marvin 42

Scientology, Church of 195–6, 200, 213, 216

Scobie, Stephen 99, 242, 409

Scott, Frank (‘F. R.’) 44, 49, 56, 71, 136–7, 400, 401

Seay, Johnny 208

Secker & Warburg 105, 110

Sedgwick, Edie 149, 171–2, 174

Seeger, Pete 56, 75, 157, 158

Selected Poems of Federico García Lorca, The 28–9

Sexsmith, Ron 440

Sherman, Georgianna (Anne/Annie) 59–62, 60, 98

Shimabukuro, Jake 329

Showalter, Dr Allan 124, 124n, 129

Shrek (movie) 329

Shuchat, Rabbi Wilfred 16, 23–4, 49

Simon and Garfunkel 161, 175, 187, 192, 203

Simon, Andrew 139

Simon, John 175, 177, 178, 179–80, 182, 189

Simon, Paul 176

Simone, Nina 140

Sincerely L. Cohen (musical) 332

Sisters of Mercy (musical) 259

Sisters of Mercy 332

Six Montreal Poets (spoken-word album) 55–6, 131

Sloman, Larry ‘Ratso’ 272, 277–8, 305, 320, 324, 32–8, 469

Smeck, Roy 30

Smith, A. J. M. 56, 136

Smith, Harry 196–7, 198, 206, 272

Smith, Patti 156, 198

Snow, Hank 243

Soldo, Dino 454, 492

Solidarity 326, 327, 328

Some Kind of Record: Poems in Tribute to Leonard Cohen 409

Songs from the Life of Leonard Cohen (BBC documentary) 346

Songwriters Hall of Fame, Canada 434

Songwriters Hall of Fame, U.S. 477

Sony ATV 427

Sony Music 427, 449

Sophia, Kiria 82

Sounds 294, 325

Souster, Raymond 138

Spanish Civil War, 1936-39 29

Sparks, Brett 413

Sparks, Rennie 413

Spector, Phil 273, 279–80, 281–94, 297, 298, 300, 301, 365, 415–16, 418, 429, 441, 444

Springsteen, Bruce 356, 455

St Kateri Tekakwitha 133, 146–7, 146, 480

Stranger Music 169

Steinberg, Arnold 35, 36, 37–8, 42, 44, 63, 74

Stendhal 26

Stevens, Wallace 47, 66

Stills, Stephen 141

Stina Möter Leonard Cohen, Spring 1996 (TV documentary) 391

Stone, Oliver 370

Stormy Clovers 137, 138, 141, 147

Straub, Dick 469

Sunday Times 329

Sutherland, Betty 50, 66, 69

Swift, Taylor 477

Switzerland 239–42, 244

Take This Waltz (book of tribute) 376

Tales of the Hasidim: The Later Masters (Buber) 195

Talmud 8, 110, 314, 315

Tekakwitha, Catherine 130, 133, 134, 146

Ten Years After 228

Tennessee 189, 190, 209–11, 216, 235, 237, 257

Terry, Ian 337

Tétrault, Philip 428

Thaylor, Fred 278

The Shining People Of Leonard Cohen (dance performance) 220

This Beggar’s Description (film) 428

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto 112

Thomas, Anjani 321, 325, 326, 327, 337, 365, 400, 405–6, 408, 419, 420, 421, 422, 424, 426, 430, 434, 435, 437, 438, 439, 440, 441, 442, 443, 445, 448, 449–50, 451, 453, 454–5, 474–5, 486, 492, 505

Thomas, Dylan 155, 218, 469

Thomas, Elkin 243n

Thompson, Linda 413

Thompson, Marc Anthony 413

Thompson, Teddy 413

Three Songs for Chorus a Capella (Glass) 446

Tibetan Book of the Dead, The 104, 376

Timberlake, Justin 329, 476

Times Literary Supplement 110, 135–6, 242

Tinkie (Scottish terrier) 15, 16, 35

Tiny Tim 164, 179, 181, 432

Top Gear (radio show) 194

Top Tunes Artist Vol. 19 TT–110 449

Toronto Daily Star 99, 134, 139, 448, 464

Toronto Film Festival 433

Toronto University 130

Tower of Song (tribute album) 389

Tricycle 438, 448

Trocchi, Alexander 100–1, 105, 116

Troubadour, Los Angeles 273, 282

Trudeau, Pierre 113, 231, 375, 409, 435

Truman, Harry 55

Tunström, Göran 83

25 Lessons In Hypnotism How To Become An Expert Operator 19

U2 389, 433, 444

Ungar, Leanne 265, 321, 322, 323, 352, 366, 367, 372–3, 403, 404, 407, 418, 421, 454

University of British Columbia 67, 118, 120

University of the New World 240

Vaillancourt, Armand 113, 121, 122, 123, 125

Van Ronk, Dave 215

Vartan, Sylvie 140

Vega, Suzanne 334, 391

Velikovsky, Immanuel 239–41

Velvet Underground 149, 150

Verdal, Suzanne 120–6

Vick, Richard 103–5, 279

Vietnam War, 1955–75 196, 231

Viking Press 110, 130, 189

Village Voice 127, 137, 149

Vincent, Warren 179

Viva 215

W. R. Cuthbert & Company 63

Wainwright III, Loudon 216

Wainwright, Martha 413

Wainwright, Rufus 329, 413, 432–3, 434, 465, 487

Wainwright, Viva Katherine (granddaughter) 487

Waits, Tom xiii, 273, 356, 478

Walesa, Lech 327

Walker, Scott 324

Warhol, Andy 149, 150, 151, 152, 155, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 179, 198, 199, 215, 272n, 370

Warner Brothers 141, 147, 238, 240, 280, 282, 292, 351

Warnes, Jennifer 244, 246, 248, 300, 302, 305–6, 307, 308, 322, 324, 330–2, 337, 338, 340, 344, 341, 356, 365, 366, 409, 440, 454, 492

Warnung vor einer heiligen Nutte (Beware of a Holy Whore) (movie) 239

Was, Don 335

Washburn, Donna 244

Watchmen, The (movie) 330

Watkins, Mitch 305, 325, 327

WBAI 144, 158, 165

Weavers’ 56

Webb Sisters, The 456–7, 462, 464, 465, 473, 491, 492

Weill, Kurt 142, 197, 270, 413

Weird Nightmares (Mingus tribute album) 362

Weisbrodt, Jörn 487

Weisz, Sharon 340–1, 342, 346

West Bank 470

Westin, Richard 427, 428

Westmount High School, Montreal 9, 22–3, 23, 24, 28, 34, 36, 38, 469

Westmount, Montreal 3–5, 7, 9–11, 12, 20–1, 22, 27, 31–2, 35, 37, 38, 45, 49, 51, 59, 73, 114, 132, 231

White Panthers 231

Wieseltier, Leon 178, 411, 421, 505

Wilburn, Neil 202

Williams, Hank 189, 206, 340, 480

Willner, Hal 351–2, 362, 412–13, 414, 415, 416, 431, 432, 433, 443, 444

Wilson, Milton 55, 72, 119

Wirberg, Agreta 391

Wisse, Ruth 39, 54

Woodstock festival 211, 228, 505

World War I 7, 9, 15

World War II 12, 24, 47, 75, 77, 80, 84, 246, 300–1

Wrecking Crew 285 Wright, Edna 365

X Factor 329, 465

Yeats, W. B. 77, 480

Yetnikoff, Walter 323, 324, 330

Yom Kippur War, 1973 260–1, 390

York, Willie 208, 209, 209, 215

Zach, Natan 79

Zappa, Frank 179, 242, 288, 333

Zeffirelli, Franco 215

Zembaty, Maciej 326

Zemel, Carol 174

Zemel, Henry 65, 137, 174, 200, 201, 203–4, 205, 218, 239, 240, 241, 257–8, 479

Zen Center, Cimarron Street, Los Angeles 175, 211, 252, 279, 299, 300, 357, 365, 377, 380, 385, 386, 391, 403, 448, 476, 496

Zirkel, Steve 343




Chapter Eighteen

THE PLACES WHERE I USED TO PLAY

Iggy Pop has a story about Leonard Cohen. Iggy was in Los Angeles, recording an album, when one night Leonard phoned. ‘Leonard said, “Come over, I’ve got a personal ad from a girl who says she wants a lover who will combine the raw energy of Iggy Pop with the elegant wit of Leonard Cohen. I think we should reply to her as a team.”’ Iggy said, ‘“Leonard, I can’t, I’m married, you’re going to have to do this yourself.” I guess he did,’ says Iggy. ‘I don’t know if he got laid.’


— Iggy Pop was curious as to the outcome of a reply you sent a woman seeking love through a personal ad.

‘[Smiles.] As I remember it, I bumped into Iggy at a session being produced by Don Was, a friend of mine, and I showed him the clipping that someone had sent me from a San Francisco newspaper. We decided to reply and, to certify its authenticity, Don took a Polaroid of Iggy and myself sitting together in my kitchen. We spoke to the young woman – at least I spoke to her – on the telephone. But there was no personal involvement.’



Leonard surely felt an empathy with this woman who named herself ‘Fearless’, and whose ideals, when it came to romantic partners, seemed almost as formidable as his own. If nothing else, answering the ad with Iggy was an exercise in making the impossible possible – if only for a moment, and for someone other than himself. Leonard had been living with impossibilities for some time, one of them being the idea that he might ever finish another album. For more than three years he had been writing, unwriting and rewriting songs, then having finally deemed something ready to record, and having listened back to himself singing it, he would decide that it did not sound honest and needed to be rewritten once again. Leonard had been serious when he spoke about never wanting to make another album, and the thought of giving it up and going to a monastery was certainly a possibility. However arduous that existence might be, it had nothing on the hard labour that songwriting had become.

[image: Iggy and Leonard answer a personal ad]

Iggy and Leonard answer a personal ad

Various Positions, the album he had hoped would resurrect his career and his confidence as a songwriter, and help take care of his financial responsibilities, had done none of these things. It took ‘a great deal of will to keep your work straight’, he told Mat Snow in the Guardian, but ‘with all the will in the world you can’t keep your life straight. Because you’re too much of an asshole … As you get older, you get very interested in your work, because that’s where you can refine your character, that’s where you can order your world. You’re stuck with the consequences of your actions, but in your work you can go back.’1 He had left behind him, he said, a ‘shipwreck of ten or fifteen years of broken families and hotel rooms for some kind of shining idea that my voice was important, that I had a meaning in the cosmos … Well, after enough lonely nights you don’t care whether you have a meaning in the cosmos or not.’2

But still he worked. He lived alone and he recorded alone – no musicians, no producer, just an engineer – slowly and painstakingly, at a glacial pace. Leonard was spending long periods in Montreal, so several of his new songs were recorded there, in Studio Tempo. Anjani Thomas – who by coincidence was also living in Montreal at that time; her boyfriend, Ian Terry, was the studio’s head engineer – added backing vocals to some of them. ‘It really was a solo affair,’ said Leonard, ‘because I had the conception very clearly in mind, I knew exactly the way I wanted it to sound, and I was using a lot of synthesised instruments.’3 But by 1987, Leonard had reached a point where he wanted an outside pair of ears. Having been impressed by his work on Famous Blue Raincoat, he called Roscoe Beck and asked him to book a studio in LA.

Beck remembers the first time he heard the song ‘First We Take Manhattan’, which Leonard had given Jennifer Warnes for her album. What stood out was its ‘harmonic sophistication. It was no longer just folk songs on guitar. Now that Leonard was writing on keyboards, he was writing from a different perspective.’ Leonard had become used to playing his new songs alone and was keen to retain as much of that spare, unembellished feel as possible on the album. ‘He wasn’t sure at first whether we were going to hire a band,’ Beck says. ‘I think it was a mutual decision not to and to record them as they were, just as he was playing them on his keyboard.’ Leonard had upgraded from his $99 Casio to a Technics keyboard, but it was still a primitive synthesiser with no individual outputs, making it a challenge to record. The engineers, technicians, keyboard players and track performers listed in the credits far outnumber the conventional musicians. There were drum machines, synthesised strings and push-button cha-cha rhythms, as well as some of the most singular keyboard playing to have ever made it on to a major label album, such as the proudly plinked, onefinger solo on ‘Tower Of Song’. Towards the end they brought in ‘a few last people to sweeten it’, says Beck, including Sneaky Pete Kleinow on pedal steel on ‘I Can’t Forget’, John Bilezikjian on oud on ‘Everybody Knows’, and Raffi Hakopian on violin on ‘Take This Waltz’, the song Leonard had recorded in Paris for Lorca’s fiftieth-anniversary album. Jennifer Warnes came in to sing on several tracks, including the catchy, retro-pop dee-do dum-dums in ‘Tower Of Song’.

Eight songs had been completed; but an album that was eight songs and forty minutes long looked a good deal more undersized on compact disc than it would have done on a vinyl LP. So Leonard tried for a ninth. He recorded a new version of ‘Anthem’ with Beck, and strings and overdubs were added before Leonard once again pulled the song. They also recorded an early, very different version of ‘Waiting For The Miracle’. This Leonard liked. He called Beck to say how happy he was with it. Three weeks later, he called again to say that he had rewritten the lyrics and wanted to redo the vocal. In the studio, Beck discovered he had also rewritten the melody, ‘and it didn’t match up with the track we’d cut’. They kept working at the song, long into the night. ‘We cut several vocals until he got very tired. Finally he said, “I’m done, comp it”’ (meaning, make a master vocal out of the best bits of his various vocal takes). Leonard found a place to lie down and sleep while Beck worked. ‘Just as I had it together, Leonard woke up, walked into the control room and said, “Well, let’s hear it”. I played it for him and he said, “I hate it”. He left and that was that.’

The song went through several more changes before it was finished. At one point Leonard gave it to Sharon Robinson – although they had not worked together since the 1980 tour, they had remained close friends – who came back with ‘a completely different version’, says Beck, ‘that I played guitar on. I really liked Sharon’s version, but that didn’t end up being the final version either’ (which was the one that would appear on his 1992 album The Future). Another Cohen–Robinson co-write made it on to this album. On a visit to her house, he had handed her a sheet of verses – a litany of world-weary wisdom and cynicism – and asked her if she could write a melody. She did and it became the song ‘Everybody Knows’.

What struck Beck most strongly when working with Leonard on the album was the change in his voice. ‘I thought, “Wow, Leonard has found a whole new place to sing from.” The baritone element in his voice was always there – on the song “Avalanche” for instance he’s singing deep in his chest – but here he was really making use of it and his singing voice was becoming more narrative.’ His delivery was laconic, almost recitative, like an old French chansonnier who had mistakenly stumbled into a disco. It was urbane and unhurried; as one UK critic would put it, Leonard lingered on every word ‘like a kerb crawler’.4 His voice was as deep and dry, sly and beguiling as his songs. His new album had everything. It was polished and mannered but very human, it was brutally honest but very accessible, and its songs covered all the angles: sex, sophistication, love, longing, and humour – particularly humour.


I was born like this

I had no choice

I was born with the gift

of a golden voice

(‘Tower Of Song’)



The humour had always been there, but many had failed to see it – it was dark and ironic and generally aimed at himself. But the gags were never as overt as on this album.

I’m Your Man was released in February 1988 in the UK and Europe and two months later in the US and Canada. The title track presents the prophet as lounge lizard, falling to his knees, howling at the sky, trying to figure out what it is that women want and prepared to give it to them in whatever form they might require. While ‘Ain’t No Cure For Love’, a singalong about love, sex and God, was inspired by reports of the AIDS crisis, it was imbued with Leonard’s own take on love: that it is a lethal wound that a man can no more avoid than Jesus could the Cross. ‘I Can’t Forget’, which started life as a song about the exodus of the Jews from Egypt, has Leonard moving on once again, but unable now to remember his motive, having spent so long living in the myth of himself. ‘Everybody Knows’ is an infectious paean to pessimism. ‘First We Take Manhattan’ is very likely the only Eurodisco song to reference the war between the sexes and the Holocaust. ‘Tower Of Song’ is about the hard, solitary, captive life of a writer (going so far as to evoke a concentration camp in the line ‘They’re moving us tomorrow to that tower down the track’) but substitutes self-mockery for the usual self-indulgence of this type of song. He was still ‘crazy for love’ but now he ached ‘in the places where I used to play’ and in spite of all his hard work, none of it was of any significance to women, to God or even to pop-music posterity; his writing room was still a hundred floors below Hank Williams’.

The photo on the front sleeve shows Leonard dressed in a smart pinstriped suit, wearing big, French film-star sunglasses, his hair slicked back, his face as unsmiling and impenetrable as that of a Mafia don. In his hand, where a gun might be, or a microphone, is a half-eaten banana. It was shot at the former Ford motor company assembly plant in Wilmington, California, a gigantic windowed room with a vast steel-girdered indoor car park that is often used as a movie location. Jennifer Warnes was there, shooting the video for her version of ‘First We Take Manhattan’, in which Leonard had agreed to appear. Sharon Weisz, the publicist for Warnes’ record label, was on the set, shooting stills, when the steel doors of the truck-sized elevator opened and Leonard stepped out with the banana. ‘I pivoted and took one picture of him,’ says Weisz, ‘and forgot about it. When I got back the proof sheet and saw it, I thought it was really funny, and had a print made and sent it to him. A few weeks later he called and said, “What would you think if I put it on the cover of my album?” I didn’t even know he was making an album. I asked him what he was calling it, and he said I’m Your Man, and I started laughing uncontrollably.’ Although the pose was a lucky accident, Leonard could not fail to recognise how perfectly it summed up the heroics and absurdity that went into the album’s creation.

I’m Your Man rebranded Leonard, not least among younger fans, from dark, tortured poet to officially cool. Although it sounded different from Leonard’s early albums, it had that feeling of instant familiarity, rightness and durability that make for a classic. It was preceded in January 1988 by a single, ‘First We Take Manhattan’ – one of the two songs on the album already familiar to many listeners thanks to the success of Jennifer Warnes’ album. Famous Blue Raincoat had definitely helped pave the way for Leonard’s eighth album (in America in particular) and I’m Your Man sped along it, propelled by its more upbeat songs and contemporary sound. The album was a success – Leonard’s biggest since the early 70s, and biggest in America since his debut. It made Number one in several European countries, went platinum in Norway, gold in Canada, and silver in the UK, where it sold 300,000 copies before it was released in the US. It even sold well in America. Leonard waggishly attributed this to the payola he sent the marketing department of Columbia in New York.

It was a scheme hatched up with Sharon Weisz, whom he had asked to do publicity for the album. ‘He had kind of an odd relationship with the record label, since they had refused to put out his previous record, and he was very cynical about it,’ says Weisz. ‘So I was trying to figure out how he was going to work with these people and how receptive they were going to be to a new record by him.’ They did not appear over-enthused, judging by the poor turnout of people from Columbia Records at a party in his honour in New York, where the international division presented him with a Crystal Globe award for sales of more than five million albums outside the US. ‘From that point on, it sort of became the two of us against the world,’ says Weisz. She came up with a list of names of the various Columbia promotion reps across the US, and Leonard sent each of them a hand-signed letter.

‘Good morning,’ Leonard typed on a plain, grey sheet of paper, dated 1 April 1988. ‘I don’t quite know how this is done so please bear with me. I have a new record, I’M YOUR MAN, coming out next week. It is already a hit in Europe and I’m on my way there now for a major concert tour. I know I can count on your support for this new record in the US, and if you can make a couple of phone calls on my behalf, I would really appreciate it. I’ve enclosed a couple of bucks to cover the calls. Thank you in advance for your help. Regards, Leonard Cohen. PS. There’s more where this came from.’ (‘We went back and forth on whether the dollar bills should be brand new or really old,’ Weisz remembers, ‘and we settled for the kind that looked really mangy.’)

I’m Your Man was lauded by the critics on both sides of the Atlantic. John Rockwell in the New York Times called it ‘a masterpiece’; Mark Cooper wrote in UK rock magazine Q that on his best album since the mid-70s Leonard had perfected ‘the art of being Leonard Cohen … the usual gorgeous melodies and an ageing poet taking himself very seriously, until he twinkles.’5 ‘All the major critics of the era reviewed it,’ says Weisz, ‘and the reviews were extraordinary.’ Those who seemed to think that Leonard had gone away hailed it as a comeback.

On 7 February Leonard left for Europe on a promotional tour to do interviews. There was great anticipation for the concert tour, which was due to begin in April. Leonard returned to Los Angeles to prepare for it, but there was a serious problem. His manager was dying. Marty Machat was gravely ill with lung cancer, and although it was clear to almost everyone else that his condition was terminal, Machat was convinced he was going to pull through. In early March, with only weeks to go before the tour began, Leonard was getting anxious. A large sum of money had been paid into Machat & Machat’s attorney account as a tour advance, and Leonard needed access to it. He called Marty. Avril, Marty’s lover, picked up the phone.

Says Steven Machat, ‘Dad was very quiet, very shy, Leonard was very quiet, very dark, and in the middle of their relationship was Avril.’ Machat dismisses his father’s romantic partner as ‘a woman who Dad gave money to, to do Leonard’s PR’, and someone whom he ‘kept around because he thought Leonard Cohen wanted her around.’ Steven Machat did not like Leonard either. ‘I never liked him from the moment go; he never looks you in the eyes, ever. He plays victim.’ But Marty Machat, he says, loved Leonard, and would have done more for him than for anyone. Since this presumably included his son, it might not have helped relations between Steven and Leonard. ‘My dad would get on the phone with Leonard. My dad didn’t give a fuck about anyone, he wanted the money, but Leonard he would sit there with, he’d listen to Leonard. If Leonard got sick, my dad would be upset, “Oh, Leonard’s got a cold.” It was interesting. When Leonard went to Israel making believe he was going to fight in the war, all of a sudden my dad rediscovered that he was of Jewish blood.’

Steven knew that his father did not have long to live. In his mind he saw vultures circling and among them he included Leonard. But Leonard, on the eve of a major tour for what was potentially the most commercial album of his career, was doing his best to take care of business. Steven Machat says that Leonard turned to him for help and that, for his father’s sake, he agreed. Perhaps he did, although the evidence seems to indicate that Leonard turned to lawyers for advice and to women for help. With Marty’s blessing, Avril went with Leonard to the bank to withdraw the money he needed. Kelley Lynch, Marty’s secretary and assistant, stepped up and offered to take care of administrative matters for the tour. When Marty Machat died on 19 March 1988, aged sixty-seven, Lynch took various files on Leonard from the offices of Machat & Machat that the lawyers said could be taken legally, including documents relating to the publishing company that Marty Machat had set up for Leonard. Lynch took the files to LA, where she set up home and began making herself as indispensable to Leonard as Marty had once been. At one point Leonard and Kelley became lovers. Eventually she became his manager.

Meanwhile, Roscoe Beck had been putting together Leonard’s touring band. Leonard had asked him to come along as his musical director, but Beck was scheduled to produce albums by Eric Johnson and Ute Lemper. So Leonard went on the road with a band made up of Steve Meador and John Bilezikjian, both of whom had played on Leonard’s 1979–80 tour, Steve Zirkel (bass), Bob Metzger (guitar and pedal steel), Bob Furgo, Tom McMorran (both keyboards), and two new backing singers, Julie Christensen and Perla Batalla.

They were quite a pair – Julie a striking, statuesque blonde who, for half of the 80s, had sung with her then husband Chris D. in an edgy, LA punk-roots band called the Divine Horsemen, and Perla a petite, sparkling brunette of South American ancestry, with her own band and a background in jazz and rock. Both were stylish and mischievous, and accomplished singers, who had sung together in the past. Christensen was the first of the two to be hired. Beck had known her from Austin, where she sang jazz and occasionally played gigs with Passenger. Christensen can remember seeing Passenger when they returned from Leonard’s 1979–80 tour and noticing how ‘they all came back changed; everyone had some kind of aura around them of having become citizens of the world’. So there was no hesitation when Beck invited her to audition for Leonard’s 1988 tour. Henry Lewy, overseeing the rehearsals with Beck, was impressed not just with her singing but her knowledge of Leonard’s songs; she had sung them at the piano with her mother since she was a young girl. ‘I didn’t have to audition for Leonard,’ says Christensen, ‘but he wanted to meet me, because being on the road is like this marriage that’s going on.’ Over lunch, Leonard told her, ‘This is going to be a very difficult tour; we’ll be playing four or five nights a week in different cities.’ Christensen laughed and told him, ‘“Leonard, I’ve just got done doing CBGB’s and the Mab and these places where I had to pee by the side of the road and change in awful restrooms.” I was like, “Come on, let’s roll up our sleeves and go.”’ Leonard was charmed.

When Beck called Perla, since she had not grown up playing Leonard Cohen songs, she went to the record store and bought as many cassettes of his as she could find. This being America, there were not many. But Roscoe told her not to prepare anything, ‘because ninety-nine per cent of this was Leonard’s feelings about me as a person. Which made me nervous. I remember walking in, dressed in white from head to toe, and Leonard was there completely in black. We just looked at each other and laughed and that was it.’ Again, Leonard was charmed. ‘But the true magic happened when Julie and I started singing. We read each other’s minds musically, we’d never say which part we’d take, our voices were constantly mixing. Together we were a real force as a back-up singing pair.’ The day they left for Europe, Perla’s mother and father came to the airport to see her off. ‘It was my first time out of the country. My dad was really an old-fashioned kind of guy, very ill, but an elegant man, who dressed in a suit – he was like Leonard in that way – and it was a big deal to him that I was leaving for Europe. He asked Leonard to take care of me and they shook hands and Leonard promised him he would.’

[image: Perla Batalla]

Perla Batalla

The tour – fifty-nine concerts in three months – began on 5 April 1988 in Germany. ‘There was a good feeling among all the people on that tour,’ Julie says. ‘Leonard just had this way of being really like the camp counsellor. We would do this thing on that tour where, if we were jet-lagged and wide awake in the middle of the night, we would hang a hanger on the door to indicate that we were awake and it was okay to come in, and there were several times when I would go to Leonard’s room and just have snacks and chat.’ Perla remembers Leonard seeming ‘very happy, and very playful. A lot of people don’t know that side of him, but Leonard was one of the funniest people I’ve ever met, so hilarious at times you just want to crack up.’ When she and Julie came up with a spontaneous vaudeville routine on stage, Leonard happily played along with them. During the Spanish leg of the tour, Leonard had Perla translate for the audience what he said between songs – which, depending on his mood and his red-wine intake, could be long, complex and mortifying – and terrifying for a woman who had been raised speaking English. ‘Every night we were on the edge of our seats to see where he was going to go,’ Perla says. ‘It was so much fun, and as risky as live theatre sometimes.’

In Europe Leonard was mobbed by fans. ‘Women would follow us around,’ Julie says, ‘and men for that matter, and go, “Where is Leonard staying?”’ In Sweden they had to fight their way through a crowd of teenage girls to get on the ferry to Denmark. Perla says, ‘If Leonard was in the street or in a café people would come up to him, there was no privacy whatsoever. But he was very happy. We’d take long walks through the streets together and he was in his element, I think, delighted with his success.’ In the UK, the BBC made a documentary about him, Songs from the Life of Leonard Cohen, and Buckingham Palace sent him an invitation to appear at the Prince’s Trust concert, alongside Eric Clapton, Elton John, Dire Straits, the Bee Gees and Peter Gabriel. Julie remembers, ‘Peter Gabriel came up to Leonard with a couple of albums for Leonard to sign. He was like a little disciple: “Can you sign this one? And this one’s for my son.”’ Prince Charles, whose charity the concert benefited, was also a Leonard Cohen fan. ‘The orchestration is fantastic and the words, the lyrics and everything,’ the prince said in a British television interview. ‘He’s a remarkable man and he has this incredibly laid-back, gravelly voice.’6 In Iceland, Leonard was received by the president of the country.

On the eve of Independence Day they flew back to the US. By now Leonard had become used to the difference between the European and American tour experience. But the Carnegie Hall concert on 6 July could not have gone much better. The show was sold out and the media had come in droves. ‘I remember thinking that if they dropped a bomb on the place, American rock music criticism would be over,’ says Sharon Weisz, ‘because of the number of journalists who had requested tickets to this show.’ The New York Post reviewer Ira Mayer wrote, ‘If ever there is an award for emotional laureate of the pop world, Leonard Cohen will be the uncontested winner. He gave vent – magnificently – to all the doubts, fears, longings, memories and regrets that comprise love in the twentieth century.’

[image: Relaxing on tour]

Relaxing on tour

Following two West Coast shows, in Berkeley and LA, there was a three-month break before the North American tour resumed in October. At Halloween, in Texas, they performed in a TV studio for Austin City Limits, a popular long-running concert programme that aired on PBS. On 16 November the tour ended, as it had begun, in New York, where the New York Times named I’m Your Man its album of the year. Leonard stayed on in New York. Adam and Lorca were living there now and Hanukkah was just a couple of weeks away. Leonard rented a room in a hotel in one of Manhattan’s less fashionable neighbourhoods and began preparing for the holiday.

The 80s had not been easy on many of the recording artists who had come up in the 60s. They tended to flounder in a decade when style took the place of substance, yuppies replaced hippies, shiny CDs made vinyl LPs obsolete, and the drugs of choice were designed to boost egos, not to expand consciousness. Although Leonard had had a tough time of it during the first half of the 80s, by the end of the decade he had adapted far more successfully than most of his near-contemporaries. He had the style, the beats, the synthesisers and the videos – two excellent videos made by Dominique Issermann, to whom I’m Your Man had been dedicated. (Written around a picture of a man and woman ballroom dancing were the words ‘All these songs are for you, DI.’)

I’m Your Man had outsold all of his earlier albums. ‘In terms of my so-called career,’ Leonard said, ‘it certainly was a rebirth. But it was hard to consider it a rebirth on a personal level. It was made under the usual dismal and morbid conditions.’7 Suzanne was suing him over money, and his romantic relationship with Dominique was unravelling. This was a dance whose complicated steps Leonard knew well: the intimacy and the distance, the separations and reconciliations, running on the spot and, when the music stopped, the goodbye. Romance would often be replaced by an enduring friendship; Leonard appears to have remained good friends with many of his former lovers, remarkably few of whom seem to bear him any ill-will. But the more immediate result of the end of a long love affair would be a rush of freedom, which gave way to depression, from which Leonard might emerge with a poem or a song.

Leonard has claimed in several interviews – and confirmed it in the closing verse of ‘Chelsea Hotel #2’ – that he is not a sentimental or a nostalgic man, that he does not look back. Religion would validate this as a healthy position: when Lot’s wife looked back at Sodom she was turned into a pillar of salt. As a writer, although he tended to look inside himself or at his immediate environs, Leonard also looked back at lovers from whom he had parted. In The Favourite Game, Leonard’s fictional alter ego writes to the girl he loved in fond anticipation of their separation: ‘Dearest Shell, if you let me I’d always keep you 400 miles away and write you pretty poems and letters … I’m afraid to live any place but in expectation.’ As a writer Leonard seemed to thrive on this paradox of distance and intimacy. As a man, it was more complicated. Often it seemed to make him wretched, and, as a wretch, he turned to God. But as Roshi told him, ‘You can’t live in God’s world. There are no restaurants or toilets.’8

Back in LA, with little to keep him occupied, Leonard’s depression reappeared. It came ‘in cycles’, he said – sometimes even when things were going well, which would make him feel ashamed.9 ‘One might think that success helps you fix up your personal problems,’ he said, ‘but it doesn’t work that way.’10 When things were not going well, depression could send him into a serious tailspin.


‘I never knew where it was coming from and I tried everything to shake it, but nothing worked.’

— What did you try?

‘Well I tried all that stuff, all the anti-depressants before Prozac, like Demerol, Desipramine, the MAO inhibitors.’

— Valium? The morphines?

‘No, not morphine. That would have been deadly. But I tried everything right up to Zoloft and Wellbutrin. I tried everything they had. Most of it made me feel worse than when I started.’

— So, you’re an expert in all things pharmaceutical when it comes to depression?

‘I think I am. But nothing worked.’



Leonard told the actress Anjelica Houston, ‘When I was on Prozac my relationship with the landscape improved. I actually stopped thinking about myself for a minute or two.’ He stopped taking it because ‘it didn’t seem to have any effect whatsoever on my melancholy, my dark vision’, and because ‘what it does is completely annihilate the sexual drive’.11 He had friends who had recommended psychotherapy, but, he said, ‘I never deeply believed. I had no conviction that this model was workable. And having observed a number of friends who for many years had undergone this treatment, it began to be clear that it wasn’t terribly effective for these people, so I was never convinced in the value it would have for me.’12 It might be that Leonard felt that, as a former debating society president and a man of words, he could run rings around anyone trying to administer the talking cure. There were also his dignity and an almost British stiff upper lip to contend with. Leonard was not the kind of man to give someone else the responsibility of removing the suffering from him. Amphetamines helped, if he didn’t use them too much for too long – though now that he was in his fifties he was finding them hard to take at all. Drinking was also helpful, as was sex – Leonard had become something of an expert at self-medication. But what seemed to work best of all was a disciplined routine. The long hours of meditation and study that Leonard had put in with Roshi had not cured him of depression, but had helped him view the situation from a more useful perspective. He had come to recognise that his depression ‘had to do with an isolation of myself’ – an isolation he had tried to address through his various spiritual pursuits.13 The hard part was making it work in the world of restaurants and toilets.

For the first time in a long while, the world was treating him well, as regards his work. The success of I’m Your Man had pushed Leonard’s Greatest Hits album back again into the UK charts, and his American label had been inspired to give a belated release to his slighted last album Various Positions. In Canada his poetry was being celebrated in an exhibition at the Library and Archives. Both Leonard and his music appeared in a Canadian television film called A Moving Picture, a dance fantasy that featured the National Ballet of Canada. In February 1989 Leonard was in New York, where he was invited to perform on the US TV show Night Music, co-hosted by David Sanborn and Jools Holland. One of its young producers was Hal Willner.

‘Like they say about the Kennedy assassination,’ Willner says, ‘you remember the first time you heard Leonard Cohen. It was on WDAS in Philadelphia, I was very young, and “Suzanne” came on the radio, and there was nothing like it. Hearing Leonard, I think even more than Dylan, I was able to see music as poetry. When I moved to New York, I had a little internship job at Warner Brothers, around the time they were doing Death of a Ladies’ Man, and I remember seeing what a controversial figure he was within the industry. They either got it or they didn’t, there was nobody who was in the middle. That record had a very big effect on me, and Doc Pomus loved that record too, we used to listen to it all the time.’ Willner considered I’m Your Man a ‘masterpiece’. He had seen Leonard’s last show in New York at the Beacon Theatre and thought it ‘one of the most perfect concerts I’ve ever seen. Since he was doing TV for the album, I jumped at having him on the show.’

Willner had become known for curating albums and performances that featured eclectic ensembles of musicians and singers performing material written by another artist. As Willner put it, he was ‘trying to combine things that are sort of fantasy’. He took the same approach to Leonard’s appearance on Night Music. ‘Leonard said he wanted to do “Tower Of Song”, but I had a fantasy in my head of doing “Who By Fire” with Leonard and Sonny Rollins, who was another guest on the show. Usually when people jam they go with uptempo things; that song had a spiritual aspect, but I knew that people would relate.’ When he mentioned his idea to Leonard, ‘there was this silence. Then he said – tentatively – “Will he do that?”’ At the rehearsal, Leonard appeared wary. Sonny Rollins was watching him closely, as if trying to read him. Leonard looked behind him: Julie and Perla were there, watching his back. They smiled. Leonard started singing ‘Who By Fire’. Then, Willner recalls, ‘Sonny Rollins, who was sitting there staring at Leonard the whole time, picked up his horn and started wailing in a different kind of understanding of the song.’ After the rehearsal, says Julie, Rollins – ‘this saxophone colossus, this master’ – came up to her and asked, quietly, ‘Do you think Mr Cohen likes what I’m doing?’

Back in Los Angeles, a heatwave had set in. Leonard was upstairs in his duplex, in the corner of the living room, playing his Technics synthesiser – something he spent much of his time doing when he was not needed elsewhere. He was happy enough in his cell with its bare floorboards and its plain white walls, no pictures or distractions. The windows were open, letting in the sweltering heat. He had thought about installing air conditioning but would not get around to it until the next decade. He was interrupted by the phone ringing. It was a young woman friend, Sean Dixon, who sounded distressed and wanted Leonard to come over. They had met when Leonard was working at Rock Steady Studios on I’m Your Man; Dixon was the receptionist. One day Leonard had gone to the studio with Leanne Ungar to pick up the master tapes, since they planned to mix them in another studio. When they arrived, Dixon had been there on her own, nursing a stray dog she had just found in the street. Leonard decided on the spot that they would stay and mix at Rock Steady. ‘Every day’, Dixon remembers, ‘I would come in with this little lost dog which was very depressed. And we would just sit there when Leonard wasn’t working and hold this little dog, while he talked and thought about what he wanted to do.’

Dixon was actually phoning Leonard about a cat. Her room-mate had gone back to Texas, leaving her with Hank, a long-haired cat of indeterminate age which was now very sick. The vets could not figure out what was wrong with it. The enema and IV fluids they had given him on the previous two visits had not helped. Hank crawled under the Murphy bed in her small apartment. Dixon thought he was dying. The next morning she went to take him back to the vet, but her car was gone, it had been stolen. ‘I pleaded with Leonard, “Can’t you please just come and look at him? I don’t know what to do.”’

Leonard drove over and Dixon pulled the cat out from under the bed. ‘He looked horrible, he was covered with all this medicine he had spit up and he hadn’t groomed in days. But right away Leonard said, “Oh, I don’t think this is a dying animal.” He said, “I’m going to chant to him.” I thought, “Oh my God, Leonard is such a freak,” but he was, “No, really, it vibrates all the internal organs, it’s a really good thing.” I was desperate so I said, “Okay, fine, you do whatever you want to do.” So he put Hank on the bed.

[image: Leonard recreates the healing of Hank the cat]

Leonard recreates the healing of Hank the cat

‘There was a chair at the end of the bed, right up against the bed, and Leonard sat and leaned over, put his mouth right up against Hank’s forehead, and he just chanted like they chant at the monastery, “Ooooooooooooooooooom,” very, very deeply, way lower than he sings, like a rumble. He did that for ten minutes – and he’s allergic to cats so his nose was running and his eyes were running and he was getting stuffed up, but he just kept doing it. And Hank just sat there, didn’t try to get away or scratch him or anything. Then finally Leonard stopped and said, “That’s it, darling, that’ll fix him up,” with total confidence.’ He gave her $1,000, insisting that she use it to get another car, and left. Hank slunk back under the bed. ‘But in the middle of the night I heard him get up and wander into the kitchen and I heard a lot of strangled sounds coming from the cat box. The next thing I heard in the morning was Hank crunching away on his food. I couldn’t believe he was eating, he hadn’t eaten in days. Then I looked at the cat box, expecting to see something really horrible, but the weird thing was there wasn’t anything – the miracle of the cat box. And the cat was fine. Apart from the odd hairball he was never sick again.’

Dixon witnessed another demonstration of Leonard’s skills at his house, when his kitchen was invaded by ants. ‘They were all over the counter and I was looking for something to spray them with, and he said “No. I’ll get them to go. Watch.” He leaned over, pointed his finger and admonished them: “You get out of my kitchen this instant, all of you, right now, get going!” He did that for a few minutes and, I swear, the ants all left and didn’t come back. A cat-whisperer and an ant-whisperer.’

Two miracles. Enough to qualify Leonard for sainthood. He had also, miraculously, found another love and muse – a beautiful blonde actress, smart, successful, and almost thirty years younger than him. ‘I don’t think anyone masters the heart,’ said Leonard. ‘It continues to cook like a shish kebab, bubbling and sizzling in everyone’s breast.’14 Or it does on the flames in the ovens in the tower of song.


Chapter Sixteen

A SACRED KIND OF CONVERSATION

Author interviews with LC, Suzanne Elrod, Nancy Bacal, Steve Sanfield, John Lissauer, Lewis Furey, Roscoe Beck, Harvey Kubernik, John Bilezikjian, Terry Oldfield, Dennis Lee, Sharon Robinson, Rabbi Mordecai Finley.

Books and films: LC, Book of Mercy, Jonathan Cape, 1984. Harry Rasky, Song of Leonard Cohen, film, 1980. Harry Rasky, The Song of Leonard Cohen: Portrait of a Poet, a Friendship and a Film, Souvenir Press, 2001. Howard Sounes, Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan, Grove, 2001.

1. Barbara Amiel, Maclean’s, September 1978

2. Columbia Records press release, 1979

3. Nick Paton Walsh, Observer, 14 October 2001

4. SS, 2001

5. Sounes, 2001

6. SS, 2001

7. ibid.

8. ZDF TV, Germany, 31 October 1979

9. Rasky, 1980

10. ‘So Long, Marianne’, Songs from a Room, Columbia, 1969

11. Debra Cohen, Rolling Stone, 21 February 1980

12. Larry ‘Ratso’ Sloman, High Times, February 1980

13. NME, 1979

14. SS, 2001

15. Brad Buchholz, Austin American Statesman, 31 March 1979

16. Pamela Andriotakis and Richard Oulahan, People, 14 January 1980

17. Rasky, 1980

18. ibid.

19. ibid.

20. Nick Duerden, Guardian, 7 October 2011

21. SS, 2001

22. LC to Robert Sward, 1984

23. NME, 2 March 1985

24. Bruce Headlam, Saturday Night, December 1997

25. ibid.

26. Fevret, 1991

27. Sward, 1984

28. Peter Gzowski, Leonard Cohen at 50, CBC TV, 1984


Chapter Fifteen

I LOVE YOU, LEONARD

Phil Spector was thirty-six years old, five years younger than Leonard; a small, fastidious man with bright eyes and a receding hairline and chin. In matters of dress Spector favoured bespoke suits and ruffled shirts, or sometimes a cape and wig. Between them they reflected his status as ‘the first Tycoon of Teen’ (as Tom Wolfe dubbed him) and, for many years, the Emperor of Pop. Spector had been nineteen years old when he wrote and recorded his first number one in 1958, a song called ‘To Know Him Is To Love Him’, its title taken from the words on his father’s tombstone. In 1960 Spector became a record producer, then the head of his own record label. During the first half of the 60s he turned out more than two dozen hits.

There had been record producers before Phil Spector but there was nobody like him. Other producers worked behind the scenes; Spector was up-front, flamboyant, eccentric, and more famous than many of the acts whom he recorded. His records were ‘Phil Spector’ records, the artists and musicians merely bricks in his celebrated ‘Wall of Sound’ – the name that was given to Spector’s epic production style. It required battalions of musicians all playing at the same time – horns bleeding into drums bleeding into strings bleeding into guitars – magnified through tape echo. With this technique Spector transformed pop ballads and R & B songs, like ‘Be My Baby’, ‘Da Doo Ron Ron’ and ‘Unchained Melody’ into dense, clamorous, delirious mini-symphonies that captured in two and a half exquisite minutes the joy and pain of teenage love.

Leonard was not a teenager. It is quite possible he never was a teenager. Leonard’s songs, like his poetry, were a grown-up’s songs. His lyrics were sophisticated and his melodies uncluttered, which gave his words room to breathe and resonate. His delivery was plain and his taste in production, as in most everything else, was subtle and understated. Other than finding themselves the last two left at a car-key party, it is hard to picture Leonard Cohen and Phil Spector ever ending up as musical bedfellows. But by the grace of Marty Machat they did. Machat’s logic was simple. He had a client – Spector – who was one of the best-known names in American pop, but who had hit a rough patch and was about to lose them a lot of money if he didn’t give Warner Brothers an album soon. And he had another client – Leonard – who was revered almost everywhere but America, who was co-writing songs with a producer far less celebrated than Spector – Lissauer – whose last album with Leonard had done nothing to get him into the US charts. Spector had seen Leonard play at the Troubadour and told Machat he had been ‘entranced’. Leonard had confessed to being a fan of Spector’s early records, considering them ‘so expressive I wouldn’t mind being his Bernie Taupin’.1 So why not put them together and have Leonard do the lyrics and Spector the music? It would solve the Spector problem, and perhaps even Leonard’s problem too.

As it turned out, Leonard and Spector had more in common than one might think, besides both being East Coast Jews who shared a manager. Spector and Leonard had both lost their fathers when they were nine years old – Spector’s committed suicide – and who had very close relationships with their mothers. Each deeply loved the sound of women’s singing voices – Spector, who often wrote for women, had put together several 60s girl groups. Both were very serious about and protective of their work. They were also both subject to black moods and, in 1976, when they began working together, were in disintegrating relationships, and drinking heavily. So began the extraordinary story of Death of a Ladies’ Man.

Spector lived in a twenty-room mansion, a Spanish–Beverly Hills movie-star hacienda built in the early 20s. There was a fountain in the front, a swimming pool in the back and, all around, lush gardens. The property was ringed with a barbed fence hung with ‘Keep Out’ signs. Should someone choose to ignore the warning, there were armed guards. When Leonard first walked up its front steps, Suzanne beside him, the maid who answered the door led them past an antique suit of armour and walls hung with old oil paintings and framed photographs – Lenny Bruce, Muhammad Ali, Martin Luther King, John Lennon, Spector’s heroes and friends – to the living room. Like the rest of the house, it was cold and dimly lit; there was more light coming from the aquarium and the jukebox than from the grand chandelier overhead.

Spector had invited the couple to dinner. It was a small gathering and Spector turned out to be a charming host – smart, funny and convivial. But as the night wore into morning and the empty bottles piled up, Spector became increasingly animated. One by one the guests took their leave; only Leonard and Suzanne remained. When they finally got up to go, Spector shouted to his staff to lock the doors. ‘He wouldn’t let us out of his house,’ Suzanne says. Leonard suggested that if they were going to stay all night, they might find something more interesting to do than shout at the servants. By the next day, when the door was unlocked and Leonard and Suzanne allowed to go home, Leonard and Spector had worked up a new arrangement of country singer Patti Page’s ‘I Went To Your Wedding’ and had made the first forays into co-writing songs.

Over the coming weeks, Leonard was a regular visitor to the mansion. Spector was a night owl, so it would be afternoon before Leonard would drive the short distance from his rented house in Brentwood. Leonard was dressed for work, wearing a suit and carrying a briefcase. He looked, Dan Kessel recalls, ‘like a suave, continental Dustin Hoffman’. The maid would take Leonard to the living room, where the thick velvet curtains were firmly drawn against the bright California sun and an air conditioner blasted icy air, and leave him there alone, giving his eyes time to adjust to the round-the-clock twilight. A few minutes later Spector would make his entrance, flanked by Dan and David Kessel. The Kessel brothers had known Spector since childhood; their father, the jazz guitarist Barney Kessel, was a close friend of Spector who had played on a number of his hit records. His sons, who were also guitar players, had in turn appeared on several Spector records including John Lennon’s Rock ’n’ Roll album, which Spector produced.

An antique silver cart was rolled in, laden with drinks and food. While the Kessel brothers retired to the adjoining room, Spector’s office, Leonard and Phil hung out for a while and chatted before getting to work. Sometimes they would pick a song to listen to from Spector’s jukebox, which was stacked with obscure R & B and rock ’n’ roll as well as old hit singles: Elvis, Dion, Dylan, Sun-era Johnny Cash, Frankie Laine. Then they would start work on the songwriting, sitting together at the piano on the long mahogany bench. The Kessel brothers would listen in on the studio monitors in the office, giving an opinion when Spector asked for it, and, when their services were required, coming in and playing guitar. The rest of the time they shot pool.

‘All day and into the night, every day, they would work for a while, break for a while, work for a while, break for a while,’ says David Kessel. ‘Suggestions went back and forth between them. Leonard had notes with him and Phil would say, “Well okay, that storyline goes on this kind of a music track”, or Phil would have the music track and Leonard would go, “Hey man, that kind of brings to mind this for me.” Many times during breaks I sat outside with Leonard by the fountain and he would go, “Wow, this is different.” “This is interesting.” “This should be quite something.” “I’ve never done this like this.” He would use us as sounding boards: could we give him any insights as to where this was headed or what he could expect? All Phil said about it was, “This is cool, it’s going to be interesting; I want to see how it comes out and hopefully it’ll come out pretty good.”’ Dan Kessel remembers, ‘Leonard was notoriously slow and deliberate, Phil got straight on it